This year we are pleased to offer a mix of on-site presentations and “remote” visits: a virtual “in-person” presentation or a pre-recorded presentation tailored to your group.

To order a presentation use the online form.

Featured: Presentations suitable for STEM Classes (and everyone else!)

PLAGUES AND PANDEMICS [our most popular presentation!]
In-person or virtual
Michelle Lessard, Sydney Kennedy or Alex Bullock, PhD Students
We are currently living in a global pandemic, but pandemics are nothing new. This presentation explores the evidence for ancient diseases and how people responded to them. We will look at the descriptions of pandemics written by eyewitnesses and compare them to osteoarcheological remains (ancient skeletons!) to see how scholars can study the effects of pandemics within different societies.

HOW ERATOSTHENES MEASURED THE CIRCUMFERENCE OF THE EARTH
In-person or virtual
Michelle Lessard, PhD Student
How do you measure the size of Earth without satellite technology or circling the globe yourself? More than 2,200 years ago, the philosopher/scientist Eratosthenes did just that. This presentation discusses Eratosthenes' method of calculation of Earth's circumference as well as his life and times, and students will gain not only insight into Eratosthenes' discovery but also the scientific and mathematical developments connected to the famed Library of Alexandria. Versions of this presentation geared to either middle or high school audiences are available.

ANCIENT GREEK MEDICAL EXPERIMENTS
In-person or virtual
Michelle Lessard, PhD Student
Ancient Greek doctors had some unusual ideas about how the body functioned. In the Hippocratic corpus, a series of medical treatises from the 4th and 5th centuries BCE, some doctors used analogies and experiments to support their theories and reveal the mysterious inner workings of the body. In this presentation, we will explore some of the notable experiments from these texts and consider what these experiments tell us about Greek medicine and the development of scientific thought.

ANCIENT STORIES IN THE STARS
In-person or virtual
Luiza dos Santos Souza, PhD Student
Human curiosity about the stars has existed for a very long time. The era of space exploration--the race to the Moon, sci-fi series, and the search for life on Mars--in fact, started millennia ago with the attentive observation of the heavenly bodies. Many stories from Greek Mythology deal with the existence of constellations which frequently memorialize heroes, heroines, and creatures in the sky. In this presentation we will discuss some of these stories, learn about the Zodiac constellations and the movements of the stars, and explore how the setting and rising of some stars was essential to the daily lives of the Ancient Greeks, from farming to sea voyages.

Featured: Presentations suitable for Civics or History Classes (and everyone else!)

POMPEII: LIFE FROM THE ASHES
In-person or virtual
Michelle Lessard, Ph.D. Student
Walk with ancient Romans! This presentation will take students on a behind-the-scenes tour of Pompeii, a Roman city buried in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Tour stops will include the town forum, an elite house, a “fast food joint,” the theatre district, the amphitheater, and the cemeteries outside the city walls. And did you know that Cincinnati has been digging up Pompeii for over a decade? In fact it’s the largest area of Pompeii to be excavated in the past 200 years! We’ll show you what we’ve been discovering and learning about an entire neighborhood of the city. This presentation can be modified to include more on volcanology.

ALEXANDER THE GREAT: MAN OF GLORY
In-person or virtual
Tiziano Boggio, Ph.D. Student
He was tutored by the great philosopher Aristotle. He won his first battle at age 18 and became king at 20. He attacked and conquered the greatest empire known to ancient Greeks. He reached the borders of India with his army. All this before dying suddenly and mysteriously when only 33 years old. This and more is what made Alexander of Macedon one of the most famous characters in history. His life and deeds were recorded by Greek and Roman historians, and entered the tradition of many other people. Let’s embark on a trip to discover more about a man who single-handedly changed the course of history, and marked the beginning of a new era for the Greek world. We will learn more about his conquest of the East and the effects that this had. On the road, we will uncover some of the mysteries of this “Great” leader, while also observing what we still have in common with Alexander himself.

MASSACRE IN THE WOODLANDS: A 2000 YEAR OLD ROMAN COLD CASE
In-person or virtual

Alessandro Battaglia, Ph.D. Student
In the Summer of 9 AD, three Roman legions marching into the German woodlands were ambushed by German warriors and slaughtered almost to a man. The Romans lost up to 20,000 men in one of their most dramatic defeats, stopping any further Roman expansion into Germany. For centuries archaeologists and historians looked for the battle site identified with the battle of Teutoburg, looking into the Roman historians' accounts to find a suitable location. Finally, the combined efforts of archaeologists and historians yielded a possible site in the late 80's: the hill of Kalkriese. Together, we will investigate the battlefield at Kalkriese and the history of its discovery. Together, we will decide whether this archaeological site in the woodlands of Northern Germany fits the profile of the battle of Teutoburg. In our in-depth investigation, we will examine the weapons, tools, and everyday objects of both Romans and Germans, and see what the battlefield at Kalkriese can tell us about the battle that took place there 2000 years ago. 

THE ROMAN ARMY: THE PEOPLE WHO BROUGHT YOU THE ROMAN EMPIRE
In-person or virtual
Alessandro Battaglia, Ph.D. Student
Everyone knows the Roman army was a powerful military force, but did you know it did much more than fight wars? It developed the road network that tied the empire together, brought men from around the Mediterranean to defend the borders, and took Rome from a village on the banks of a modest Italian river to unrivaled mastery. Along the way, it brought fame and power to Cincinnatus, Julius Caesar, and Constantine—to name just a few! This talk will explore the life and times of the Roman army—how it fought, what it looked like, and what its soldiers were up to when they weren’t at war. You’ll get a sense of the wealth of surviving evidence: from literature and fine sculpture to the letters soldiers wrote, the shoes they wore, and the tombstones they designed for themselves.

AND THE CROWD GOES WILD!: A DAY AT THE GLADIATORIAL GAMES
In-person or virtual
Luiza dos Santos Souza or Haley Bertram, Ph.D. Students
We’ve all seen Hollywood’s depictions of gladiatorial combat, but what was a day at the games really like? Through the eyes of the Roman citizen Marcus, you’ll experience the full program of events at the spectacle that defined the Roman Empire and literally set the stage for many of today’s entertainments, including mixed-martial arts events and Spanish bullfights. Enjoy the history of the Colosseum, the greatest amphitheater of the Roman world, and watch as the action pits man against beast in the venationes. Hear about the training of the fighters, learn to tell the difference between types of gladiators based on their armor, and cheer on your favorite fighter in a final battle as an experienced retiarius attempts to win his freedom. Finally, exiting the amphitheater, you will discover the true meaning of what the Romans referred to as a vomitorium!

THE ORIGINAL DEMOCRATS AND REPUBLICANS: CONSTITUTIONS OF ANCIENT ATHENS AND ROME
In-Person
Patrick O’Callahan, Ph.D. student
We often hear about how much our American system of government owes to Greece and Rome, but what were the realities of the Athenian and Roman constitutions that inspired America's Founding Fathers? This presentation will explore where our principles of democracy come from, what the Roman Senate looked like, and how checks and balances worked in ancient constitutions. But it will also cover some of the stark differences between the ancient world and the modern, like the Athenian practice of exiling politicians who got too popular, or the Roman ability to legally replace their government with a dictator--but only for six months!

DEMOCRACY THROUGH THE EYES OF A WOMAN: ASPASIA IN ANCIENT ATHENS [Now with Classical music!]
In-person or virtual
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. student
We take democracy for granted today, but we do not often realize that it was first born as a groundbreaking experiment in ancient Greece! More than two thousand years ago Athens, Greece witnessed the birth of a new society, where freedom of speech and equality before the law were more important than noble ancestry and wealth—at least for some. Notably, the first democracy did not allow women, slaves, or foreigners living in Athens to vote. We will venture through the streets of this colorful and dynamic city with a special companion, Aspasia, guiding us. Aspasia is a real historical figure, born in what is now Turkey. As a woman and a foreigner, she challenges the narrow minds of the all-male democratic government. Through her eyes we will witness the power of freedom of speech through the subtle political criticism of ancient Greek plays and through sparkling debates with exceptional personalities, such as Socrates. Join this amazing journey back in time: we will explore Aspasia's challenges and emotions through words and music, performed for the occasion by our own Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. If there is more to Classical Athens than its immaculate white marbles, music will be the best medium to evoke the different feelings Aspasia experienced during her adventurous life.

THE WORLD OF WOMEN IN HOMER’S ODYSSEY [Now with Classical music!]
In-person or virtual
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
Homer’s Odyssey has fascinated audiences for thousands of years thanks to the incredible and captivating adventures of its main character, Odysseus. But Homer’s world is populated with fascinating women at every stage of the hero’s troubled journey. This presentation will take us into the world of four mythological women, all different from one another, yet all crucial to Odysseus’ tale: Calypso, the powerful, loving nymph; Nausicaa, a young girl growing up; Circe, the enigmatic witch; and Penelope, Odysseus’ wife, his perfect match in skill and cunning. Together we will explore the world of these mythological women and their differences. We will also combine each woman to a specific score the talented musicians of our Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra will provide us. These four pieces will better capture their emotions during Odysseus' quest, as we turn the spotlight from the hero to their female companions. (This presentation can be tailored to coincide with a unit on the Homeric poems or so that outside knowledge of the Odyssey is not necessary.)

PASSION, MADNESS AND LOVE: WOMEN IN ANCIENT MYTH [Now with Classical music]
In-person or virtual
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
Adaptable for modules on women in the Iliad and Aeneid 
We usually associate Greek mythology with heroes, such as Achilles, Jason, or Hercules. What about the women? Greek society often left them in the background, as secondary characters in the male sagas. Mythology, however, is a different story. Women in myth are active and resolute: they are no longer wives and daughters happy to live quietly inside the house. Through this presentation, we will focus on women whose strong agency and determination still fascinates us. Together we will explore the stories of tragic characters (such as Medea and Phaedra), and the volition of young women (as Antigone and Electra). We can also look at the Trojan War from the perspective of all the women it affected. Helen and Clytemnestra are not so different from Hecuba, Andromache and Cassandra: beyond their status, they are all reacting to the same chain of destruction. The performance of evocative scores by our Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra will help us appreciate the different emotions animating each character. 

LOVE, TRUTH AND MADNESS: THE TRAGIC LIFE OF HERACLES [New and with Classical music]
In-person or virtual
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
Adaptable for modules on the hero and his journey
When we think of Greek tragedy, the name of Oedipus easily comes to mind. Tragedy, however, is much more than the iconic downfall of the Theban king we all know (and love!) thanks to Sophocles. The genre encompasses many other plays which have often been unfairly overlooked, but it is up to us to change this perception! Today, we will focus on another masterpiece, Sophocles’ Trachiniae. The drama does not revolve around a tragic hero, but rather on the friction between two very different characters: Heracles and Deianira. Heracles and Deianira are husband and wife, but they could not be more different. Heracles is a man of excesses and strong appetites, whereas Deianira is a devoted woman patiently waiting for him to come home. In the end, both of them will become victims of their raw emotions and realize the extent of their mistakes, as it happens to people all the time. We will conclude with a clip of Puccini’s beloved opera, Tosca. The performance by the Cincinnati Opera and the CSO, will make us realize how different characters are dealing with the same, tragic dilemmas we are all facing in our lives. 

HEROES: FATHERS AND SONS
In-person or virtual
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. student
Adaptable for modules on the Iliad or the Odyssey
Greek mythology features a gallery of “heroes.” When we think of heroes, we imagine individuals selflessly devoted to protect humanity against its bitter enemies. Ancient heroes are different: they are ambitious men, eager to prove their worth by embarking on adventurous quests. Each hero starts as someone’s son, but he quickly needs to forge his own path and reinforce the good name of his family. The challenge is huge and appears often in Greek myth. We will take you to the Iliad and the Odyssey and we will focus on the stories of ancient heroes you are most interested in: Ajax, Achilles, Agamemnon, but also Odysseus, Aeneas and Hector. Despite their differences, they are all left with the same dilemma: looking to their noble past but also glancing towards their unknown future.

MAGIC AND MALICE: WITCHES OF THE ANCIENT WORLD
In-person or virtual
Kelsey Schalo, Ph.D. student
The literary ancient witch was one of monstrous and malicious intent. From roaming graveyards to slaughtering children for love potions, the ancient witch struck fear into the hearts of men, and their horrific descriptions challenged even the most horrific of monsters. Yet, the majority of real-life 'spell-casters' were men. Why this fear? Why women? In this presentation, we will explore the terror and hatred that fueled descriptions of the ancient witch, and examine the divine power that rivals even the gods. Note: contains graphic descriptions but is available in a PG version.

DIGGING UP HOMER
In-person or virtual
Maura Brennan, Ph.D. Student
Did the Trojan War really happen? This presentation is designed to give the audience an introduction to the archaeological evidence for one of the most gripping stories of the ancient world, Homer’s Iliad. Discussion focuses on archaeological excavations at Bronze Age palaces in Greece including those of Agamemnon and Nestor at Mycenae and Pylos, and from the citadel at Troy. Different forms of archaeological evidence including ceramics, fortifications, weapons, wall paintings, bones, and bathtubs paint a varied and dynamic picture of an ancient way of life. But is this enough to prove Homer’s tale? To answer this tantalizing question, this presentation looks at the problems involved when Homer and archaeology are brought together and what archaeologists are doing to figure out the best ways to determine if “X” truly marks the spot.

WHAT DO ARCHAEOLOGISTS DO, ANYWAY?
In-person or virtual
Rebecca Kerns, Ph.D. Student
This presentation explores the work of archaeologists and our place in society. The word “archaeologist” usually brings up images of Indiana Jones, treasure-hunting, or reanimated mummies. Real archaeology is not usually so Hollywood-friendly, but the field is full of both dangers and rewards. We will first discuss the goals of archaeology and how this discipline has contributed to our understanding of human history. We will then consider exactly what archaeologists do, including excavation, laboratory work, and experiments. We will look at a typical day on an excavation, including work, meals, accommodations, and recreation. Finally we will explore the role of archaeologists as advocates for the protection of our past.

CINCINNATI IN THE AEGEAN: GREEK ARTIFACTS IN CINCINNATI
Virtual only
Christine Weber or Jacob Engstrom, Ph.D. Students
Did you know that archaeologists from Cincinnati have been digging in the lands around the Mediterranean since the 1920s? Using objects from the departmental Classics Study Collection, this talk presents the history of Greek archaeology at the University of Cincinnati. In particular, the great characters of Cincinnati Classical archaeology - Carl Blegen, Jack Caskey, Marion Rawson - and their amazing discoveries about the prehistory of the Aegean Sea region are presented alongside some of the objects found on their digs. Together with these pioneers, we will explore the sites at Troy, Pylos and many others.

SHERD NERDS: HOW BROKEN POTS TEACH US ABOUT ANCIENT LIFE
In-person or virtual
Maura Brennan or Callie Todhunter, Ph.D. Students
When you open your kitchen cupboard, what do you see? What would an archaeologist find 2000 years in the future? The majority of artifacts that archaeologists discover are broken pieces of cups and bowls, just like the ones in your cupboards. But how do archaeologists study these broken pieces? Together, we will learn how ancient Greeks and Romans made, moved, and used pottery. We will discuss how archaeologists dig up this material, study it, and use it to learn about various aspects of the ancient world, from trade routes to how people ate and drank. Find out what pottery can tell us about people who lived 2000 years ago!

This year we are pleased to offer a mix of on-site presentations and “remote” visits: a virtual “in-person” presentation or a pre-recorded presentation tailored to your group. We have reached the end of the university academic year. If you would like to request a presentation, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to ask about availability of presentations.

Featured: Presentations suitable for STEM Classes (and everyone else!)

PLAGUES AND PANDEMICS [our most popular presentation!]
In-person or virtual
Sarah Beal, Graduate Student
We are currently living in a global pandemic, but pandemics are nothing new. This presentation explores the evidence for ancient diseases and how people responded to them. We will look at the descriptions of pandemics written by eyewitnesses and compare them to osteoarcheological remains (ancient skeletons!) to see how scholars can study the effects of pandemics within different societies.

PANDEMIC AND CORONA VIRUS: WORDS IN ENGLISH FROM ANCIENT GREEK AND LATIN
Virtual only
Rebecka Lindau and Mike Braunlin, John Miller Burnam Classics Library
Did you know that almost 40% of English words derive from ancient Greek and Latin? Familiarity with these languages can help you analyze parts of words to figure out their meanings in English and other modern languages derived from or influenced by these ancient languages, and, not the least, can improve your scores at standardized tests such as the SAT!


HOW ERATOSTHENES MEASURED THE CIRCUMFERENCE OF THE EARTH
In-person or virtual
Austin Hattori, Ph.D. Student
How do you measure the size of Earth without satellite technology or circling the globe yourself? More than 2,200 years ago, the philosopher/scientist Eratosthenes did just that. This presentation discusses Eratosthenes' method of calculation of Earth's circumference as well as his life and times, and students will gain not only insight into Eratosthenes' discovery but also the scientific and mathematical developments connected to the famed Library of Alexandria. Versions of this presentation geared to either middle or high school audiences are available.

ANCIENT STORIES IN THE STARS
In-person or virtual
Luiza dos Santos Souza, PhD Student
Human curiosity about the stars has existed for a very long time. The era of space exploration--the race to the Moon, sci-fi series, and the search for life on Mars--in fact, started millennia ago with the attentive observation of the heavenly bodies. Many stories from Greek Mythology deal with the existence of constellations which frequently memorialize heroes, heroines, and creatures in the sky. In this presentation we will discuss some of these stories, learn about the Zodiac constellations and the movements of the stars, and explore how the setting and rising of some stars was essential to the daily lives of the Ancient Greeks, from farming to sea voyages.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE IN ACTION
Virtual only
Anna Belza, Ph.D. Student
Did you know that archaeology is described as a science? Archaeologists today are required to use social sciences, environmental sciences, mathematics, and humanities to understand the ways that peopled lived in the past, to conduct archaeological investigations, and to interpret the material we uncover. In recent years, archaeologists have begun to employ modern technologies and science more than ever before. In this outreach presentation, your audience will learn about how these methods are applied to Old World (Mediterranean) and New World (South American) archaeological expeditions to best uncover the past. We will cover various topics such as: remote sensing methods like Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) which are used to locate urban centers in the Mayan plains and archaeological remains at ancient Greek sites; Portable X-ray Fluorescence (PXRF) which can be used remotely to identify the chemical make-up of an artifact (like silver cups from a warrior’s grave!); Radiocarbon dating which is used to reconstruct diet and ancient environments (what did ancient Greeks eat?); and organic residue analysis which allows archaeologists to understand what the ancients ate and drank. This outreach is suited to all age-ranges and audience levels and can be tailored by request.

Ancient Greek Medical Experiments
In-person or virtual
Michelle Lessard, PhD Student
Ancient Greek doctors had some unusual ideas about how the body functioned. In the Hippocratic corpus, a series of medical treatises from the 4th and 5th centuries BCE, some doctors used analogies and experiments to support their theories and reveal the mysterious inner workings of the body. In this presentation, we will explore some of the notable experiments from these texts and consider what these experiments tell us about Greek medicine and the development of scientific thought.

Featured: Presentations suitable for Civics or History Classes (and everyone else!)

DEMOCRACY THROUGH THE EYES OF A WOMAN: ASPASIA IN ANCIENT ATHENS [Now with Classical music!]
In-person or virtual
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. student
We take democracy for granted today, but we do not often realize that it was first born as a groundbreaking experiment in ancient Greece! More than two thousand years ago Athens, Greece witnessed the birth of a new society, where freedom of speech and equality before the law were more important than noble ancestry and wealth—at least for some. Notably, the first democracy did not allow women, slaves, or foreigners living in Athens to vote. We will venture through the streets of this colorful and dynamic city with a special companion, Aspasia, guiding us. Aspasia is a real historical figure, born in what is now Turkey. As a woman and a foreigner, she challenges the narrow minds of the all-male democratic government. Through her eyes we will witness the power of freedom of speech through the subtle political criticism of ancient Greek plays and through sparkling debates with exceptional personalities, such as Socrates. Join this amazing journey back in time: we will explore Aspasia's challenges and emotions through words and music, performed for the occasion by our own Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. If there is more to Classical Athens than its immaculate white marbles, music will be the best medium to evoke the different feelings Aspasia experienced during her adventurous life.

MASSACRE IN THE WOODLANDS: A 2000 YEAR OLD ROMAN COLD CASE
In-person or virtual

Alessandro Battaglia, Ph.D. Student
In the Summer of 9 AD, three Roman legions marching into the German woodlands were ambushed by German warriors and slaughtered almost to a man. The Romans lost up to 20,000 men in one of their most dramatic defeats, stopping any further Roman expansion into Germany. For centuries archaeologists and historians looked for the battle site identified with the battle of Teutoburg, looking into the Roman historians' accounts to find a suitable location. Finally, the combined efforts of archaeologists and historians yielded a possible site in the late 80's: the hill of Kalkriese. Together, we will investigate the battlefield at Kalkriese and the history of its discovery. Together, we will decide whether this archaeological site in the woodlands of Northern Germany fits the profile of the battle of Teutoburg. In our in-depth investigation, we will examine the weapons, tools, and everyday objects of both Romans and Germans, and see what the battlefield at Kalkriese can tell us about the battle that took place there 2000 years ago.      

THE ORIGINAL DEMOCRATS AND REPUBLICANS: CONSTITUTIONS OF ANCIENT ATHENS AND ROME [New!]
Virtual only
Ted Boivin, Ph.D. student
We often hear about how much our American system of government owes to Greece and Rome, but what were the realities of the Athenian and Roman constitutions that inspired America's Founding Fathers? This presentation will explore where our principles of democracy come from, what the Roman Senate looked like, and how checks and balances worked in ancient constitutions. But it will also cover some of the stark differences between the ancient world and the modern, like the Athenian practice of exiling politicians who got too popular, or the Roman ability to legally replace their government with a dictator--but only for six months!

A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO FOUNTAIN SQUARE: ROME AND THE ROOTS OF THE MODERN CITY
Virtual only
Maura Brennan or Anna Belza Ph.D. Students
If an ancient Roman traveled to modern-day Cincinnati, what would he or she think? Certainly the technology would be shocking, but in many ways, both cities have much in common. Indeed, modern cities trace their roots back to the ancient Greek "polis" and the Roman "civitas," including governmental structures and entertainment facilities. With Rome and Cincinnati, however, the similarities are all the more striking. Let's take a walk along the Ohio and Tiber rivers, comparing the many buildings in terms of their architecture, arrangement, and the different functions they play (for example: the Colosseum and Paul Brown Stadium!). We will discover how alike the modern city and its citizens are to the ancient civitas.
Note: this presentation includes some discussion of the FOUNDING FATHERS, their connection to Greece and Rome, and to Cincinnati. Educators interested in a Founding Fathers based presentation can request a modified version of the presentation that focuses more on this aspect of the presentation.

MAGIC AND MALICE: WTICHES OF THE ANCIENT WORLD [New!]
In-person or virtual
Kelsey Schalo, Ph.D. student
The literary ancient witch was one of monstrous and malicious intent. From roaming graveyards to slaughtering children for love potions, the ancient witch struck fear into the hearts of men, and their horrific descriptions challenged even the most horrific of monsters. Yet, the majority of real-life 'spell-casters' were men. Why this fear? Why women? In this presentation, we will explore the terror and hatred that fueled descriptions of the ancient witch, and examine the divine power that rivals even the gods. Note: contains graphic descriptions but is available in a PG version.

ALEXANDER THE GREAT: MAN OF GLORY
In-person or virtual
Tiziano Boggio, Ph.D. Student
He was tutored by the great philosopher Aristotle. He won his first battle at age 18 and became king at 20. He attacked and conquered the greatest empire known to ancient Greeks. He reached the borders of India with his army. All this before dying suddenly and mysteriously when only 33 years old. This and more is what made Alexander of Macedon one of the most famous characters in history. His life and deeds were recorded by Greek and Roman historians, and entered the tradition of many other people. Let’s embark on a trip to discover more about a man who single-handedly changed the course of history, and marked the beginning of a new era for the Greek world. We will learn more about his conquest of the East and the effects that this had. On the road, we will uncover some of the mysteries of this “Great” leader, while also observing what we still have in common with Alexander himself.

LOVE, TRUTH AND MADNESS: THE TRAGIC LIFE OF HERACLES [New and with Classical music]
In-person or virtual
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
Adaptable for modules on the hero and his journey
When we think of Greek tragedy, the name of Oedipus easily comes to mind. Tragedy, however, is much more than the iconic downfall of the Theban king we all know (and love!) thanks to Sophocles. The genre encompasses many other plays which have often been unfairly overlooked, but it is up to us to change this perception! Today, we will focus on another masterpiece, Sophocles’ Trachiniae. The drama does not revolve around a tragic hero, but rather on the friction between two very different characters: Heracles and Deianira. Heracles and Deianira are husband and wife, but they could not be more different. Heracles is a man of excesses and strong appetites, whereas Deianira is a devoted woman patiently waiting for him to come home. In the end, both of them will become victims of their raw emotions and realize the extent of their mistakes, as it happens to people all the time. We will conclude with a clip of Puccini’s beloved opera, Tosca. The performance by the Cincinnati Opera and the CSO, will make us realize how different characters are dealing with the same, tragic dilemmas we are all facing in our lives. 

AND THE CROWD GOES WILD!: A DAY AT THE GLADIATORIAL GAMES
In-person or virtual
Jeff Banks, Anna Belza, Luiza dos Santos Souza, or Nora Madrigal, Ph.D. Students
We’ve all seen Hollywood’s depictions of gladiatorial combat, but what was a day at the games really like? Through the eyes of the Roman citizen Marcus, you’ll experience the full program of events at the spectacle that defined the Roman Empire and literally set the stage for many of today’s entertainments, including mixed-martial arts events and Spanish bullfights. Enjoy the history of the Colosseum, the greatest amphitheater of the Roman world, and watch as the action pits man against beast in the venationes. Hear about the training of the fighters, learn to tell the difference between types of gladiators based on their armor, and cheer on your favorite fighter in a final battle as an experienced retiarius attempts to win his freedom. Finally, exiting the amphitheater, you will discover the true meaning of what the Romans referred to as a vomitorium!

THE WORLD OF WOMEN IN HOMER’S ODYSSEY [Now with Classical music!]
In-person or virtual
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
Homer’s Odyssey has fascinated audiences for thousands of years thanks to the incredible and captivating adventures of its main character, Odysseus. But Homer’s world is populated with fascinating women at every stage of the hero’s troubled journey. This presentation will take us into the world of four mythological women, all different from one another, yet all crucial to Odysseus’ tale: Calypso, the powerful, loving nymph; Nausicaa, a young girl growing up; Circe, the enigmatic witch; and Penelope, Odysseus’ wife, his perfect match in skill and cunning. Together we will explore the world of these mythological women and their differences. We will also combine each woman to a specific score the talented musicians of our Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra will provide us. These four pieces will better capture their emotions during Odysseus' quest, as we turn the spotlight from the hero to their female companions. (This presentation can be tailored to coincide with a unit on the Homeric poems or so that outside knowledge of the Odyssey is not necessary.)

DIGGING UP HOMER
Virtual only
Anna Belza, Ph.D. Student
Did the Trojan War really happen? This presentation is designed to give the audience an introduction to the archaeological evidence for one of the most gripping stories of the ancient world, Homer’s Iliad. Discussion focuses on archaeological excavations at Bronze Age palaces in Greece including those of Agamemnon and Nestor at Mycenae and Pylos, and from the citadel at Troy. Different forms of archaeological evidence including ceramics, fortifications, weapons, wall paintings, bones, and bathtubs paint a varied and dynamic picture of an ancient way of life. But is this enough to prove Homer’s tale? To answer this tantalizing question, this presentation looks at the problems involved when Homer and archaeology are brought together and what archaeologists are doing to figure out the best ways to determine if “X” truly marks the spot.

HISTORY’S LIES: FAKE NEWS AND ‘COVER-UPS’ IN ROMAN HISTORY
Virtual only
Austin Hattori, Ph.D. Students
Ancient Romans, just like many modern civilizations, had unsavory elements in their history. Wars, deaths, and transitions of power happened frequently but sometimes, these events had aspects that made the Roman people uncomfortable. In this presentation, we will discuss events in the Roman past and the different ways Roman writers talked about the unseemly aspects of their own history. What do these moments of discomfort show us about the Roman people? Does it matter if they lied about their history, or pretended certain events happened in different ways to make themselves sound better? We’ll consider these and other questions as we explore examples in Roman history that the Romans, great conquerors of the world and our cultural ancestors, preferred to forget.

THE ROMAN ARMY: THE PEOPLE WHO BROUGHT YOU THE ROMAN EMPIRE
In-person or virtual
Alessandro Battaglia, Ph.D. Student
Everyone knows the Roman army was a powerful military force, but did you know it did much more than fight wars? It developed the road network that tied the empire together, brought men from around the Mediterranean to defend the borders, and took Rome from a village on the banks of a modest Italian river to unrivaled mastery. Along the way, it brought fame and power to Cincinnatus, Julius Caesar, and Constantine—to name just a few! This talk will explore the life and times of the Roman army—how it fought, what it looked like, and what its soldiers were up to when they weren’t at war. You’ll get a sense of the wealth of surviving evidence: from literature and fine sculpture to the letters soldiers wrote, the shoes they wore, and the tombstones they designed for themselves.

CINCINNATI IN THE AEGEAN: GREEK ARTIFACTS IN CINCINNATI
Virtual only
Jeff Banks or Anna Belza, Ph.D. Students
Did you know that archaeologists from Cincinnati have been digging in the lands around the Mediterranean since the 1920s? Using objects from the departmental Classics Study Collection, this talk presents the history of Greek archaeology at the University of Cincinnati. In particular, the great characters of Cincinnati Classical archaeology - Carl Blegen, Jack Caskey, Marion Rawson - and their amazing discoveries about the prehistory of the Aegean Sea region are presented alongside some of the objects found on their digs. Together with these pioneers, we will explore the sites at Troy, Pylos and many others.

HEROES: FATHERS AND SONS
In-person or virtual
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. student
Adaptable for modules on the Iliad or the Odyssey
Greek mythology features a gallery of “heroes.” When we think of heroes, we imagine individuals selflessly devoted to protect humanity against its bitter enemies. Ancient heroes are different: they are ambitious men, eager to prove their worth by embarking on adventurous quests. Each hero starts as someone’s son, but he quickly needs to forge his own path and reinforce the good name of his family. The challenge is huge and appears often in Greek myth. We will take you to the Iliad and the Odyssey and we will focus on the stories of ancient heroes you are most interested in: Ajax, Achilles, Agamemnon, but also Odysseus, Aeneas and Hector. Despite their differences, they are all left with the same dilemma: looking to their noble past but also glancing towards their unknown future.

POMPEII: LIFE FROM THE ASHES
In-person or virtual
Michelle Lessard, Ph.D. Student
Walk with ancient Romans! This presentation will take students on a behind-the-scenes tour of Pompeii, a Roman city buried in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Tour stops will include the town forum, an elite house, a “fast food joint,” the theatre district, the amphitheater, and the cemeteries outside the city walls. And did you know that Cincinnati has been digging up Pompeii for over a decade? In fact it’s the largest area of Pompeii to be excavated in the past 200 years! We’ll show you what we’ve been discovering and learning about an entire neighborhood of the city. This presentation can be modified to include more on volcanology.

SHERD NERDS: HOW BROKEN POTS TEACH US ABOUT ANCIENT LIFE
In-person or virtual
Sarah Beal, Ph.D. Student
When you open your kitchen cupboard, what do you see? What would an archaeologist find 2000 years in the future? The majority of artifacts that archaeologists discover are broken pieces of cups and bowls, just like the ones in your cupboards. But how do archaeologists study these broken pieces? Together, we will learn how ancient Greeks and Romans made, moved, and used pottery. We will discuss how archaeologists dig up this material, study it, and use it to learn about various aspects of the ancient world, from trade routes to how people ate and drank. Find out what pottery can tell us about people who lived 2000 years ago!

PASSION, MADNESS AND LOVE: WOMEN IN ANCIENT MYTH [Now with Classical music]
In-person or virtual
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
Adaptable for modules on women in the Iliad and Aeneid 
We usually associate Greek mythology with heroes, such as Achilles, Jason, or Hercules. What about the women? Greek society often left them in the background, as secondary characters in the male sagas. Mythology, however, is a different story. Women in myth are active and resolute: they are no longer wives and daughters happy to live quietly inside the house. Through this presentation, we will focus on women whose strong agency and determination still fascinates us. Together we will explore the stories of tragic characters (such as Medea and Phaedra), and the volition of young women (as Antigone and Electra). We can also look at the Trojan War from the perspective of all the women it affected. Helen and Clytemnestra are not so different from Hecuba, Andromache and Cassandra: beyond their status, they are all reacting to the same chain of destruction. The performance of evocative scores by our Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra will help us appreciate the different emotions animating each character. 

WHAT DO ARCHAEOLOGISTS DO, ANYWAY?
In-person or virtual
Anna Belza, Rebecca Kerns, Charlie Kocurek, Ph.D. Students
This presentation explores the work of archaeologists and our place in society. The word “archaeologist” usually brings up images of Indiana Jones, treasure-hunting, or reanimated mummies. Real archaeology is not usually so Hollywood-friendly, but the field is full of both dangers and rewards. We will first discuss the goals of archaeology and how this discipline has contributed to our understanding of human history. We will then consider exactly what archaeologists do, including excavation, laboratory work, and experiments. We will look at a typical day on an excavation, including work, meals, accommodations, and recreation. Finally we will explore the role of archaeologists as advocates for the protection of our past.

ANCIENT ARTIFACTS FROM THE UC CLASSICS STUDY COLLECTION
In-person
Carol Hershenson, Curator of the Classics Study Collection
The UC Classics department owns an array of ancient artifacts, and in this virtual presentation we will use the objects to discuss what they can tell us about ancient life. We’ll consider the full life of the object, including its creation utilizing local resources, its function—both practical and symbolic, and its afterlife (how did it get to Cincinnati?). Although virtual, this presentation will allow participants to see 3000 year old objects up close and personal.

 

Here you will find an exciting list of topics. All can be modified to meet your own interests and are flexible in terms of time. New this year: some of the presentations are available by Skype to your location to offer even more flexibility. When you see a topic that sounds good, please fill out our online presentation order form with your preferred dates and presentation topics. UC’s semester system means that we will have presenters available from now through early May, 2020.

ALEXANDER THE GREAT: MAN OF GLORY
Tiziano Boggio or Simone Agrimonti, Ph.D. Students
He was tutored by the great philosopher Aristotle. He won his first battle at age 18 and became king at 20. He attacked and conquered the greatest empire known to ancient Greeks. He reached the borders of India with his army. All this before dying suddenly and mysteriously when only 33 years old. This and more is what made Alexander of Macedon one of the most famous characters in history. His life and deeds were recorded by Greek and Roman historians, and entered the tradition of many other people. Let’s embark on a trip to discover more about a man who single-handedly changed the course of history, and marked the beginning of a new era for the Greek world. We will learn more about his conquest of the East and the effects that this had. On the road, we will uncover some of the mysteries of this “Great” leader, while also observing what we still have in common with Alexander himself. Available for Skype!

AND THE CROWD GOES WILD!: A DAY AT THE GLADIATORIAL GAMES
Jeff Banks, Allie Pohler, Luiza dos Santos Souza, or Rebecca Kerns, Ph.D. Students
We’ve all seen Hollywood’s depictions of gladiatorial combat, but what was a day at the games really like? Through the eyes of the Roman citizen Marcus, you’ll experience the full program of events at the spectacle that defined the Roman Empire and literally set the stage for many of today’s entertainments, including mixed-martial arts events and Spanish bullfights. Enjoy the history of the Colosseum, the greatest amphitheater of the Roman world, and watch as the action pits man against beast in the venationes. Hear about the training of the fighters, learn to tell the difference between types of gladiators based on their armor, and cheer on your favorite fighter in a final battle as an experienced retiarius attempts to win his freedom. Finally, exiting the amphitheater, you will discover the true meaning of what the Romans referred to as a vomitorium!

THE WORLD OF WOMEN IN HOMER’S ODYSSEY
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
Homer’s Odyssey has fascinated audiences for thousands of years thanks to the incredible and captivating adventures of its main character, Odysseus. But Homer’s world is populated with fascinating women at every stage of the hero’s troubled journey. This presentation will take us into the world of four mythological women, all different from one another, yet all crucial to Odysseus’ tale: Calypso, the powerful, loving nymph; Nausicaa, a young girl growing up; Circe, the enigmatic witch; and Penelope, Odysseus’ wife, his perfect match in skill and cunning. Together we will explore the world of these mythological women. What powers do women have in a man’s world? How do they contribute crucially to a heroic quest? We’ll answer these and other questions as we turn the spotlight on Odysseus’ fabulous female companions. (This presentation can be tailored to coincide with a unit on the Homeric poems or so that outside knowledge of the Odyssey is not necessary.) Available for Skype!

DIGGING UP HOMER
Anna Belza or Sarah Beal, Ph.D. Students
Did the Trojan War really happen? This presentation is designed to give the audience an introduction to the archaeological evidence for one of the most gripping stories of the ancient world, Homer’s Iliad. Discussion focuses on archaeological excavations at Bronze Age palaces in Greece including those of Agamemnon and Nestor at Mycenae and Pylos, and from the citadel at Troy. Different forms of archaeological evidence including ceramics, fortifications, weapons, wall paintings, bones, and bathtubs paint a varied and dynamic picture of an ancient way of life. But is this enough to prove Homer’s tale? To answer this tantalizing question, this presentation looks at the problems involved when Homer and archaeology are brought together and what archaeologists are doing to figure out the best ways to determine if “X” truly marks the spot. Available for Skype!

DRAG ON A DENARIUS: ACTORS AND ACTING IN ANCIENT ROME
Andrew Lund, Ph.D. Student
From advertisements to Hollywood blockbusters (and all the tabloid sites in between), we encounter actors nearly every day. Today, these talented men and women can acquire great fame, fortune, and notoriety. But what was it like for actors in ancient Rome, and what can we say about their craft? Join us as we learn about the men (and in some cases, women!) who performed on the dramatic stage, and attempt to reconstruct how an actor might have transformed into Agamemnon or Medea for a performance through things like gesture, movement, costume, voice modulation, and masks. Travel to the stages and theaters in which these actors performed, and learn what the Romans thought about actors and their profession!

HISTORY’S LIES: GREAT ‘COVER-UPS’ IN ROMAN HISTORY
Austin Hattori or Carina Moss, Ph.D. Students
Ancient Romans, just like many modern civilizations, had unsavory elements in their history. Wars, deaths, and transitions of power happened frequently but sometimes, these events had aspects that made the Roman people uncomfortable. In this presentation, we will discuss events in the Roman past and the different ways Roman writers talked about the unseemly aspects of their own history. What do these moments of discomfort show us about the Roman people? Does it matter if they lied about their history, or pretended certain events happened in different ways to make themselves sound better? We’ll consider these and other questions as we explore examples in Roman history that the Romans, great conquerors of the world and our cultural ancestors, preferred to forget.

THE ROMAN ARMY: THE PEOPLE WHO BROUGHT YOU THE ROMAN EMPIRE
Allessandro Battaglia or Justin Alimaras, Ph.D. Students
Everyone knows the Roman army was a powerful military force, but did you know it did much more than fight wars? It developed the road network that tied the empire together, brought men from around the Mediterranean to defend the borders, and took Rome from a village on the banks of a modest Italian river to unrivaled mastery. Along the way, it brought fame and power to Cincinnatus, Julius Caesar, and Constantine—to name just a few! This talk will explore the life and times of the Roman army—how it fought, what it looked like, and what its soldiers were up to when they weren’t at war. You’ll get a sense of the wealth of surviving evidence: from literature and fine sculpture to the letters soldiers wrote, the shoes they wore, and the tombstones they designed for themselves.

CINCINNATI IN THE AEGEAN: AEGEAN OBJECTS IN CINCINNATI
Jeff Banks or Anna Belza, Ph.D. Students
Did you know that archaeologists from Cincinnati have been digging in the lands around the Mediterranean since the 1920s? Using objects from the departmental Classics Study Collection, this talk presents the history of Greek archaeology at the University of Cincinnati. In particular, the great characters of Cincinnati Classical archaeology - Carl Blegen, Jack Caskey, Marion Rawson - and their amazing discoveries about the prehistory of the Aegean region are presented alongside some of the objects found on their digs. Together with these pioneers, we will explore the sites at Troy, Pylos and many others.

POMPEII: LIFE FROM THE ASHES
Shelby Raynor, Ph.D. Student
Walk with ancient Romans! This presentation will take students on a behind-the-scenes tour of Pompeii, a Roman city buried in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Tour stops will include the town forum, an elite house, a “fast food joint,” the theatre district, the amphitheater, and the cemeteries outside the city walls. And did you know that Cincinnati has been digging up Pompeii for over a decade? In fact it’s the largest area of Pompeii to be excavated in the past 200 years! We’ll show you what we’ve been discovering and learning about an entire neighborhood of the city.

SHERD NERDS: HOW BROKEN POTS TEACH US ABOUT ANCIENT LIFE
Sarah Beal, Ph.D. Student
When you open your kitchen cupboard, what do you see? What would an archaeologist find 2000 years in the future? The majority of artifacts that archaeologists discover are broken pieces of cups and bowls, just like the ones in your cupboards. But how do archaeologists study these broken pieces? Together, we will learn how ancient Greeks and Romans made, moved, and used pottery. We will discuss how archaeologists dig up this material, study it, and use it to learn about various aspects of the ancient world, from trade routes to how people ate and drank. Then I will ask you to become the archaeologist and sort your own collection of ancient pottery. Find out what pottery can tell us about people who lived 2000 years ago! Available for Skype!

PASSION, MADNESS AND LOVE: WOMEN IN ANCIENT MYTH
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
We usually associate Greek mythology with the astonishing exploits of heroes, such as Achilles, Jason, or Hercules. What about the women? Greek society often left them in the background, in a secondary position as wives and daughters. But the women of mythology are a different story. They seize active roles and receive a prominence that women seldom experienced in real life. However, by doing this, they go against one of their most important obligations: live quietly and stay inside the house. Through this presentation, we will focus on three women whose strong agency and determination mark them out as sinister to the Greek imagination and yet somewhat heroic to ours. Medea, the sorcerer who left her homeland because of love; Antigone, the girl who sacrificed herself on behalf of her family; and Phaedra, the woman who died because of an insane passion. Together we will explore the stories of these women and investigate what they can tell us about being a woman in Ancient Greece in a man’s world. Available for Skype!

ANCIENT VILLAGERS AND CITY SLICKERS
Sarah Wenner, Ph.D. Student
What was it like to live in the past? This presentation brings to life the space and everyday activities of ancient farmers and urbanites. How did an ancient farm work and what kind of jobs did farmers do every day? How can we get at the sights and sounds of living in an ancient city like Athens or Rome, and what did urbanites do to make a living? We will see how archaeologists use the trash of the past to answer these questions. This presentation will step into ancient farmhouses and giant apartment buildings. The secrets of good shepherding and the sales tricks of urban shopkeepers will be revealed. But it won't be all hard work, because the ancients knew how to have fun too! Available for Skype!

WHAT DO ARCHAEOLOGISTS DO, ANYWAY?
Shelby Raynor, Ph.D. Student
This presentation explores the work of archaeologists and our place in society. The word “archaeologist” usually brings up images of Indiana Jones, treasure-hunting, or reanimated mummies. Real archaeology is not usually so Hollywood-friendly, but the field is full of both dangers and rewards. We will first discuss the goals of archaeology and how this discipline has contributed to our understanding of human history. We will then consider exactly what archaeologists do, including excavation, laboratory work, and experiments. We will look at a typical day on an excavation, including work, meals, accommodations, and recreation. Finally we will explore the role of archaeologists as advocates for the protection of our past.

THE CENTURIONS OF THE ROMAN ARMY: THE MEN UNDERNEATH THE ARMOR
Simone Agrimonti, Ph.D. Student
Meet the Roman centurion: one of the most iconic figures from antiquity. The success of the Roman army was legendary and the centurions were the key to this success. They kept ranks, kept order, and kept cooler heads in combat. Yet, these famous soldiers were more than simply military machines. This talk will discuss evidence from ancient inscriptions and literature (including the New Testament) to reveal the real men underneath the armor.

ANCIENT ART FROM THE UC CLASSICS STUDY COLLECTION
Carol Hershenson, PhD student and Curator of the Classics Study Collection
Get up close and personal with genuine objects of ancient art! This presentation brings a selection of artifacts from the Classics Study Collection to your classroom and community to encourage a hands-on discussion of their place in Greek art and society. We’ll consider the full life of the piece of ‘art’, including its creation utilizing local resources, the techniques of producing Greek pottery (illustrated with actual examples), a discussion of “What is Art?”, and an exercise on how archaeologists learn from these fragments of the past. Students and residents have the opportunity to handle the artifacts, and to examine our finest vases more closely than they will ever see them in a museum.

A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO FOUNTAIN SQUARE: ROME AND THE ROOTS OF THE MODERN CITY
Jeff Banks, Ph.D. Student
If an ancient Roman traveled to modern-day Cincinnati, what would he or she think? Certainly the technology would be shocking, but in many ways, both cities have much in common. Indeed, modern cities trace their roots back to the ancient Greek "polis" and the Roman "civitas," including governmental structures and entertainment facilities. With Rome and Cincinnati, however, the similarities are all the more striking. Let's take a walk along the Ohio and Tiber rivers, comparing the many buildings in terms of their architecture, arrangement and the different functions they play (for example: the Colosseum and Paul Brown Stadium!). We will discover how alike the modern city and its citizens are to the ancient civitas.
Note: this presentation includes some discussion of the FOUNDING FATHERS, their connection to Greece and Rome, and to Cincinnati. Educators interested in a Founding Fathers based presentation can request a modified version of the presentation that focuses more on this aspect of the presentation.

 

All presentations will be offered remotely this year, but you can choose from a live “in-person” presentation or a pre-recorded presentation tailored to your group. All presentations can be modified to meet your own interests, age group, and time limit. When you see a topic that sounds good, please fill out our online presentation order form with your preferred dates, topics, and method of delivery. UC’s semester system means that we will have presenters available from now through early May 2021.

Featured: Presentations suitable for STEM Classes (and everyone else!)

PLAGUES AND PANDEMICS [New!]
Sarah Beal, Christine Wong, or Brent Arehart, Graduate Students
We are currently living in a global pandemic, but pandemics are nothing new. This presentation explores the evidence for ancient diseases and how people responded to them. We will look at the descriptions of pandemics written by eyewitnesses and compare them to osteoarcheological remains (ancient skeletons!) to see how scholars can study the effects of pandemics within different societies.  

PANDEMIC AND CORONA VIRUS: WORDS IN ENGLISH FROM ANCIENT GREEK AND LATIN [New!]
Rebecka Lindau and Mike Braunlin, John Miller Burnam Classics Library
Did you know that almost 40% of English words derive from ancient Greek and Latin? Familiarity with these languages can help you analyze parts of words to figure out their meanings in English and other modern languages derived from or influenced by these ancient languages, and, not the least, can improve your scores at standardized tests such as the SAT!
 

HOW ERATOSTHENES MEASURED THE CIRCUMFERENCE OF THE EARTH [New!]
Austin Hattori, Ph.D. Student
How do you measure the size of Earth without satellite technology or circling the globe yourself? More than 2,200 years ago, the philosopher/scientist Eratosthenes did just that. This presentation discusses Eratosthenes' method of calculation of Earth's circumference as well as his life and times, and students will gain not only insight into Eratosthenes' discovery but also the scientific and mathematical developments connected to the famed Library of Alexandria. Versions of this presentation geared to either middle or high school audiences are available. 

SICK DAY! HOW TO SURVIVE AN ANCIENT FEVER [New!]
Christine Wong, M.A. Student
You wake up and have a fever. What do you do? This presentation follows an ancient Greek as he travels from doctors to healing sanctuaries to find a cure. We will explore ancient remedies to common diseases and examine the archaeological remains of medical practices. This presentation is an interactive choose your own adventure!

ANCIENT STORIES IN THE STARS [New!]
Luiza dos Santos Souza, PhD Student
Human curiosity about the stars has existed for a very long time. The era of space exploration--the race to the Moon, sci-fi series, and the search for life on Mars--in fact, started millennia ago with the attentive observation of the heavenly bodies. Many stories from Greek Mythology deal with the existence of constellations which frequently memorialize heroes, heroines, and creatures in the sky. In this presentation we will discuss some of these stories, learn about the Zodiac constellations and the movements of the stars, and explore how the setting and rising of some stars was essential to the daily lives of the Ancient Greeks, from farming to sea voyages.

MIND YOUR HUMORS: HOW ANCIENT MEDICINE BECAME MODERN [New!]
Brent Arehart, Ph.D. student
Everybody has heard of Hippocrates and his famous oath, which doctors to this day still swear by in one form or another. But what kind of medicine did Hippocrates actually practice, and how does it compare to our medicine? In this talk, we will explore some of the major ideas that the Greeks and Romans had about health. While many of these ideas seem ridiculous today, they remained influential for centuries. Even up until the 1800s, the system of Western medicine was still widely based on the writings of Hippocrates and his most famous fan, Galen. By investigating how two men that got it so wrong were believed to be right for so long, we can learn an important lesson about the relationship between humanity and science.

ANCIENT CURSES AND MAGICAL MALADIES [New!]
Christine Wong, M.A. Student
Ancient Greeks and Romans often turned to magic to solve their everyday problems. From curse tablets and voodoo dolls to herbal remedies and incantations, magic provides an insight into the ancient understandings of the natural world. In this presentation, we will explore how ancient magic worked, what it was used for, and how it was perceived.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE IN ACTION
Anna Belza, Ph.D. Student
Did you know that archaeology is described as a science? Archaeologists today are required to use social sciences, environmental sciences, mathematics, and humanities to understand the ways that peopled lived in the past, to conduct archaeological investigations, and to interpret the material we uncover. In recent years, archaeologists have begun to employ modern technologies and science more than ever before. In this outreach presentation, your audience will learn about how these methods are applied to Old World (Mediterranean) and New World (South American) archaeological expeditions to best uncover the past. We will cover various topics such as: remote sensing methods like Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) which are used to locate urban centers in the Mayan plains and archaeological remains at ancient Greek sites; Portable X-ray Fluorescence (PXRF) which can be used remotely to identify the chemical make-up of an artifact (like silver cups from a warrior’s grave!); Radiocarbon dating which is used to reconstruct diet and ancient environments (what did ancient Greeks eat?); and organic residue analysis which allows archaeologists to understand what the ancients ate and drank. This outreach is suited to all age-ranges and audience levels and can be tailored by request.

 

Also new this year is a presentation on the birth of ancient Greek Democracy suitable for a Civics or American History curriculum (and everyone!).

DEMOCRACY THROUGH THE EYES OF A WOMAN: ASPASIA IN ANCIENT ATHENS[New!]
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. student  
We take democracy for granted today, but we do not often realize that it was first born as a groundbreaking experiment in ancient Greece! More than two thousand years ago Athens, Greece witnessed the birth of a new society, where freedom of speech and equality before the law were more important than noble ancestry and wealth—at least for some. Notably, the first democracy did not allow women, slaves, or foreigners living in Athens to vote. We will venture through the streets of this colorful and dynamic city with a special companion, Aspasia, guiding us. Aspasia is a real historical figure, born in what is now Turkey. As a woman and a foreigner, she challenges the narrow minds of the all-male democratic government. Through her eyes we will witness the power of freedom of speech through the subtle political criticism of ancient Greek plays and through sparkling debates with exceptional personalities, such as Socrates. Join this amazing journey back in time to discover the first democracy at work. Aspasia will demonstrate that there is more to Athens than its immaculate white marbles.

A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO FOUNTAIN SQUARE: ROME AND THE ROOTS OF THE MODERN CITY
Maura Brennan or Jeff Banks, Ph.D. Students
If an ancient Roman traveled to modern-day Cincinnati, what would he or she think? Certainly the technology would be shocking, but in many ways, both cities have much in common. Indeed, modern cities trace their roots back to the ancient Greek "polis" and the Roman "civitas," including governmental structures and entertainment facilities. With Rome and Cincinnati, however, the similarities are all the more striking. Let's take a walk along the Ohio and Tiber rivers, comparing the many buildings in terms of their architecture, arrangement and the different functions they play (for example: the Colosseum and Paul Brown Stadium!). We will discover how alike the modern city and its citizens are to the ancient civitas.
Note: this presentation includes some discussion of the FOUNDING FATHERS, their connection to Greece and Rome, and to Cincinnati. Educators interested in a Founding Fathers based presentation can request a modified version of the presentation that focuses more on this aspect of the presentation.

ALEXANDER THE GREAT: MAN OF GLORY
Tiziano Boggio, Ph.D. Student
He was tutored by the great philosopher Aristotle. He won his first battle at age 18 and became king at 20. He attacked and conquered the greatest empire known to ancient Greeks. He reached the borders of India with his army. All this before dying suddenly and mysteriously when only 33 years old. This and more is what made Alexander of Macedon one of the most famous characters in history. His life and deeds were recorded by Greek and Roman historians, and entered the tradition of many other people. Let’s embark on a trip to discover more about a man who single-handedly changed the course of history, and marked the beginning of a new era for the Greek world. We will learn more about his conquest of the East and the effects that this had. On the road, we will uncover some of the mysteries of this “Great” leader, while also observing what we still have in common with Alexander himself. 

AND THE CROWD GOES WILD!: A DAY AT THE GLADIATORIAL GAMES
Jeff Banks, Allie Pohler, Luiza dos Santos Souza, or Rebecca Kerns, Nora Madrigal, Ph.D. Students
We’ve all seen Hollywood’s depictions of gladiatorial combat, but what was a day at the games really like? Through the eyes of the Roman citizen Marcus, you’ll experience the full program of events at the spectacle that defined the Roman Empire and literally set the stage for many of today’s entertainments, including mixed-martial arts events and Spanish bullfights. Enjoy the history of the Colosseum, the greatest amphitheater of the Roman world, and watch as the action pits man against beast in the venationes. Hear about the training of the fighters, learn to tell the difference between types of gladiators based on their armor, and cheer on your favorite fighter in a final battle as an experienced retiarius attempts to win his freedom. Finally, exiting the amphitheater, you will discover the true meaning of what the Romans referred to as a vomitorium!

THE WORLD OF WOMEN IN HOMER’S ODYSSEY
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
Homer’s Odyssey has fascinated audiences for thousands of years thanks to the incredible and captivating adventures of its main character, Odysseus. But Homer’s world is populated with fascinating women at every stage of the hero’s troubled journey. This presentation will take us into the world of four mythological women, all different from one another, yet all crucial to Odysseus’ tale: Calypso, the powerful, loving nymph; Nausicaa, a young girl growing up; Circe, the enigmatic witch; and Penelope, Odysseus’ wife, his perfect match in skill and cunning. Together we will explore the world of these mythological women. What powers do women have in a man’s world? How do they contribute crucially to a heroic quest? We’ll answer these and other questions as we turn the spotlight on Odysseus’ fabulous female companions. (This presentation can be tailored to coincide with a unit on the Homeric poems or so that outside knowledge of the Odyssey is not necessary.) 

DIGGING UP HOMER
Anna Belza, Ph.D. Student
Did the Trojan War really happen? This presentation is designed to give the audience an introduction to the archaeological evidence for one of the most gripping stories of the ancient world, Homer’s Iliad. Discussion focuses on archaeological excavations at Bronze Age palaces in Greece including those of Agamemnon and Nestor at Mycenae and Pylos, and from the citadel at Troy. Different forms of archaeological evidence including ceramics, fortifications, weapons, wall paintings, bones, and bathtubs paint a varied and dynamic picture of an ancient way of life. But is this enough to prove Homer’s tale? To answer this tantalizing question, this presentation looks at the problems involved when Homer and archaeology are brought together and what archaeologists are doing to figure out the best ways to determine if “X” truly marks the spot. 

HISTORY’S LIES: FAKE NEWS AND ‘COVER-UPS’ IN ROMAN HISTORY
Austin Hattori, Ph.D. Students
Ancient Romans, just like many modern civilizations, had unsavory elements in their history. Wars, deaths, and transitions of power happened frequently but sometimes, these events had aspects that made the Roman people uncomfortable. In this presentation, we will discuss events in the Roman past and the different ways Roman writers talked about the unseemly aspects of their own history. What do these moments of discomfort show us about the Roman people? Does it matter if they lied about their history, or pretended certain events happened in different ways to make themselves sound better? We’ll consider these and other questions as we explore examples in Roman history that the Romans, great conquerors of the world and our cultural ancestors, preferred to forget.

THE ROMAN ARMY: THE PEOPLE WHO BROUGHT YOU THE ROMAN EMPIRE
Allessandro Battaglia, Ph.D. Student
Everyone knows the Roman army was a powerful military force, but did you know it did much more than fight wars? It developed the road network that tied the empire together, brought men from around the Mediterranean to defend the borders, and took Rome from a village on the banks of a modest Italian river to unrivaled mastery. Along the way, it brought fame and power to Cincinnatus, Julius Caesar, and Constantine—to name just a few! This talk will explore the life and times of the Roman army—how it fought, what it looked like, and what its soldiers were up to when they weren’t at war. You’ll get a sense of the wealth of surviving evidence: from literature and fine sculpture to the letters soldiers wrote, the shoes they wore, and the tombstones they designed for themselves.

CINCINNATI IN THE AEGEAN: GREEK ARTIFACTS IN CINCINNATI
Jeff Banks or Anna Belza, Ph.D. Students
Did you know that archaeologists from Cincinnati have been digging in the lands around the Mediterranean since the 1920s? Using objects from the departmental Classics Study Collection, this talk presents the history of Greek archaeology at the University of Cincinnati. In particular, the great characters of Cincinnati Classical archaeology - Carl Blegen, Jack Caskey, Marion Rawson - and their amazing discoveries about the prehistory of the Aegean Sea region are presented alongside some of the objects found on their digs. Together with these pioneers, we will explore the sites at Troy, Pylos and many others.

HEROES: FATHERS AND SONS [New!]
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. student
Greek mythology features a gallery of heroes: ambitious men, searching for glory and eager to prove their worth by undertaking challenges. They remind us of comic book superheroes, but they are extremely different. When we think of heroes, we imagine individuals selflessly devoting themselves to the common good, by protecting humanity against its bitter enemies. Instead, Ancient heroes dealt with another, internal struggle: they need to forge their own path, but also continue the good reputation of their family. Each hero starts as someone’s son, but will then himself become a father projecting on his offspring the same, heroic aspirations he entertained as a kid. The relationship between fathers and sons appears often in Greek plays, where ancient myth is the perfect medium for society to address its deepest concerns. We will follow the stories of three famous ancient heroes who participated in the Trojan war: Ajax, Achilles, and Agamemnon. Their sons are left with open questions and no easy answers: how to succeed under the shadow of a famous father? As any son in real life, they are at a crossroads, looking to their noble past but also glancing towards their unknown future. After all, myth is not as distant as one could think. 

POMPEII: LIFE FROM THE ASHES
Michelle Lessard, Ph.D. Student
Walk with ancient Romans! This presentation will take students on a behind-the-scenes tour of Pompeii, a Roman city buried in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Tour stops will include the town forum, an elite house, a “fast food joint,” the theatre district, the amphitheater, and the cemeteries outside the city walls. And did you know that Cincinnati has been digging up Pompeii for over a decade? In fact it’s the largest area of Pompeii to be excavated in the past 200 years! We’ll show you what we’ve been discovering and learning about an entire neighborhood of the city.

SHERD NERDS: HOW BROKEN POTS TEACH US ABOUT ANCIENT LIFE
Sarah Beal, Ph.D. Student
When you open your kitchen cupboard, what do you see? What would an archaeologist find 2000 years in the future? The majority of artifacts that archaeologists discover are broken pieces of cups and bowls, just like the ones in your cupboards. But how do archaeologists study these broken pieces? Together, we will learn how ancient Greeks and Romans made, moved, and used pottery. We will discuss how archaeologists dig up this material, study it, and use it to learn about various aspects of the ancient world, from trade routes to how people ate and drank. Find out what pottery can tell us about people who lived 2000 years ago! 

PASSION, MADNESS AND LOVE: WOMEN IN ANCIENT MYTH 
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
We usually associate Greek mythology with the astonishing exploits of heroes, such as Achilles, Jason, or Hercules. What about the women? Greek society often left them in the background, in a secondary position as wives and daughters. But the women of mythology are a different story. They seize active roles and receive a prominence that women seldom experienced in real life. However, by doing this, they go against one of their most important obligations: live quietly and stay inside the house. Through this presentation, we will focus on three women whose strong agency and determination mark them out as sinister to the Greek imagination and yet somewhat heroic to ours. Medea, the sorcerer who left her homeland because of love; Antigone, the girl who sacrificed herself on behalf of her family; and Phaedra, the woman who died because of an insane passion. Together we will explore the stories of these women and investigate what they can tell us about being a woman in Ancient Greece in a man’s world. 

ANCIENT VILLAGERS AND CITY SLICKERS
Sarah Beal, Ph.D. Student
What was it like to live in the past? This presentation brings to life the space and everyday activities of ancient farmers and urbanites. How did an ancient farm work and what kind of jobs did farmers do every day? How can we get at the sights and sounds of living in an ancient city like Athens or Rome, and what did city dwellers do to make a living? We will see how archaeologists use the trash of the past to answer these questions. This presentation will step into ancient farmhouses and giant apartment buildings. The secrets of good shepherding and the sales tricks of urban shopkeepers will be revealed. But it won't be all hard work, because the ancients knew how to have fun too! 

WHAT DO ARCHAEOLOGISTS DO, ANYWAY?
Shelby Raynor or Charlie Kocurek, Ph.D. Students
This presentation explores the work of archaeologists and our place in society. The word “archaeologist” usually brings up images of Indiana Jones, treasure-hunting, or reanimated mummies. Real archaeology is not usually so Hollywood-friendly, but the field is full of both dangers and rewards. We will first discuss the goals of archaeology and how this discipline has contributed to our understanding of human history. We will then consider exactly what archaeologists do, including excavation, laboratory work, and experiments. We will look at a typical day on an excavation, including work, meals, accommodations, and recreation. Finally we will explore the role of archaeologists as advocates for the protection of our past.

ANCIENT ARTIFACTS FROM THE UC CLASSICS STUDY COLLECTION
Maura Brennan or Carol Hershenson, Ph.D. student and Curator of the Classics Study Collection
The UC Classics department owns an array of ancient artifacts, and in this virtual presentation we will use the objects to discuss what they can tell us about ancient life. We’ll consider the full life of the object, including its creation utilizing local resources, its function—both practical and symbolic, and its afterlife (how did it get to Cincinnati?).  Although virtual, this presentation will allow participants to see 3000 year old objects up close and personal.

Here you will find an exciting list of topics. All can be modified to meet your own interests and are flexible in terms of time. When you see a topic that sounds good, please fill out our online presentation order form with your preferred dates and presentation topics. UC’s semester system means that we will have presenters available from now through early May, 2019.

ALEXANDER THE GREAT: MAN OF GLORY (New Offering!)
Simone Agrimonti, Ph.D. Student
He was tutored by the great philosopher Aristotle. He won his first battle at age 18 and became king at 20. He attacked and conquered the greatest empire known to ancient Greeks. He reached the borders of India with his army. All this before dying suddenly and mysteriously when only 33 years old. This and more is what made Alexander of Macedon one of the most famous characters in history. His life and deeds were recorded by Greek and Roman historians, and entered the tradition of many other people. Let’s embark on a trip to discover more about a man who single-handedly changed the course of history, and marked the beginning of a new era for the Greek world. We will learn more about his conquest of the East and the effects that this had. On the road, we will uncover some of the mysteries of this “Great” leader, while also observing what we still have in common with Alexander himself.

AND THE CROWD GOES WILD!: A DAY AT THE GLADIATORIAL GAMES
Mohammed Bhatti, Ph.D. Student
We’ve all seen Hollywood’s depictions of gladiatorial combat, but what was a day at the games really like? Through the eyes of the Roman citizen Marcus, you’ll experience the full program of events at the spectacle that defined the Roman Empire and literally set the stage for many of today’s entertainments, including mixed-martial arts events and Spanish bullfights. Enjoy the history of the Colosseum, the greatest amphitheater of the Roman world, and watch as the action pits man against beast in the venationes. Hear about the training of the fighters, learn to tell the difference between types of gladiators based on their armor, and cheer on your favorite fighter in a final battle as an experienced retiarius attempts to win his freedom. Finally, exiting the amphitheater, you will discover the true meaning of what the Romans referred to as a vomitorium!

THE WORLD OF WOMEN IN HOMER’S ODYSSEY (New Offering!)
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
Homer’s Odyssey has fascinated audiences for thousands of years thanks to the incredible and captivating adventures of its main character, Odysseus. But Homer’s world is populated with fascinating women at every stage of the hero’s troubled journey. This presentation will take us into the world of four mythological women, all different from one another, yet all crucial to Odysseus’ tale: Calypso, the powerful, loving nymph; Nausicaa, a young girl growing up; Circe, the enigmatic witch; and Penelope, Odysseus’ wife, his perfect match in skill and cunning. Together we will explore the world of these mythological women. What powers do women have in a man’s world? How do they contribute crucially to a heroic quest? We’ll answer these and other questions as we turn the spotlight on Odysseus’ fabulous female companions. (this presentation can be tailored to coincide with a unit on the Homeric poems or so that outside knowledge of the Odyssey is not necessary)

PASSION, MADNESS AND LOVE: WOMEN IN ANCIENT MYTH (New Offering!)
Cecilia Cozzi, Ph.D. Student
We usually associate Greek mythology with the astonishing exploits of heroes, such as Achilles, Jason, or Hercules. What about the women? Greek society often left them in the background, in a secondary position as wives and daughters. But the women of mythology are a different story. They seize active roles and receive a prominence that women seldom experienced in real life. However, by doing this, they go against one of their most important obligations: live quietly and stay inside the house. Through this presentation, we will focus on three women whose strong agency and determination mark them out as sinister to the Greek imagination and yet somewhat heroic to ours. Medea, the sorcerer who left her homeland because of love; Antigone, the girl who sacrificed herself on behalf of her family; and Phaedra, the woman who died because of an insane passion. Together we will explore the stories of these women and investigate what they can tell us about being a woman in Ancient Greece in a man’s world.

DIGGING UP HOMER
Maura Brennan, Ph.D. Student
Did the Trojan War really happen? This presentation is designed to give the audience an introduction to the archaeological evidence for one of the most gripping stories of the ancient world, Homer’s Iliad. Discussion focuses on archaeological excavations at Bronze Age palaces in Greece including those of Agamemnon and Nestor at Mycenae and Pylos, and from the citadel at Troy. Different forms of archaeological evidence including ceramics, fortifications, weapons, wall paintings, bones, and bathtubs paint a varied and dynamic picture of an ancient way of life. But is this enough to prove Homer’s tale? To answer this tantalizing question, this presentation looks at the problems involved when Homer and archaeology are brought together and what archaeologists are doing to figure out the best ways to determine if “X” truly marks the spot.

STEP RIGHT UP: A TOUR OF THE ACROPOLIS OF ATHENS
Vasiliki Tsikritea, Ph.D. Student
A stone outcrop rising over the heart of Athens, the Acropolis was an important center of ancient Athenian religious worship and community gathering, and remains one of the most iconic images of the ancient world. In the 5th century BC, the Acropolis was the site of a large-scale building program, instigated by the general Pericles. During this time, the Acropolis and its new monuments, especially the Parthenon, became the symbol of Athens and Athenian greatness in the ancient Greek world. This richly illustrated presentation offers an overview of the history and monuments of the Acropolis, emphasizing the important roles the Acropolis played in how the people of Athens related to their gods, themselves, and others.

DRAG ON A DENARIUS: ACTORS AND ACTING IN ANCIENT ROME (New Offering!)
Andrew Lund, Ph.D. Student
From advertisements to Hollywood blockbusters (and all the tabloid sites in between), we encounter actors nearly every day. Today, these talented men and women can acquire great fame, fortune, and notoriety. But what was it like for actors in ancient Rome, and what can we say about their craft? Join us as we learn about the men (and in some cases, women!) who performed on the dramatic stage, and attempt to reconstruct how an actor might have transformed into Agamemnon or Medea for a performance through things like gesture, movement, costume, voice modulation, and masks. Travel to the stages and theaters in which these actors performed, and learn what the Romans thought about actors and their profession! (Available Spring Semester 2019.)

HISTORY’S LIES: GREAT ‘COVER-UPS’ IN ROMAN HISTORY
Carina Moss, Ph.D. Student
Ancient Romans, just like many modern civilizations, had unsavory elements in their history. Wars, deaths, and transitions of power happened frequently but sometimes, these events had aspects that made the Roman people uncomfortable. In this presentation, we will discuss events in the Roman past and the different ways Roman writers talked about the unseemly aspects of their own history. What do these moments of discomfort show us about the Roman people? Does it matter if they lied about their history, or pretended certain events happened in different ways to make themselves sound better? We’ll consider these and other questions as we explore examples in Roman history that the Romans, great conquerors of the world and our cultural ancestors, preferred to forget.

THE ROMAN ARMY: THE PEOPLE WHO BROUGHT YOU THE ROMAN EMPIRE
C.J. Miller, Ph.D. Student
Everyone knows the Roman army was a powerful military force, but did you know it did much more than fight wars? It developed the road network that tied the empire together, brought men from around the Mediterranean to defend the borders, and took Rome from a village on the banks of a modest Italian river to unrivaled mastery. Along the way, it brought fame and power to Cincinnatus, Julius Caesar, and Constantine—to name just a few! This talk will explore the life and times of the Roman army—how it fought, what it looked like, and what its soldiers were up to when they weren’t at war. You’ll get a sense of the wealth of surviving evidence: from literature and fine sculpture to the letters soldiers wrote, the shoes they wore, and the tombstones they designed for themselves.

CINCINNATI IN THE AEGEAN: AEGEAN OBJECTS IN CINCINNATI
Jeff Banks and Anna Belza, Ph.D. Students
Did you know that archaeologists from Cincinnati have been digging in the lands around the Mediterranean since the 1920s? Using objects from the departmental Classics Study Collection, this talk presents the history of Greek archaeology at the University of Cincinnati. In particular, the great characters of Cincinnati Classical archaeology - Carl Blegen, Jack Caskey, Marion Rawson - and their amazing discoveries about the prehistory of the Aegean region are presented alongside some of the objects found on their digs. Together with these pioneers, we will explore the sites at Troy, Pylos and many others.

POMPEII: LIFE FROM THE ASHES
Christopher Motz, Ph.D. Student
Walk with ancient Romans! This presentation will take students on a behind-the-scenes tour of Pompeii, a Roman city buried in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Tour stops will include the town forum, an elite house, a “fast food joint,” the theatre district, the amphitheater, and the cemeteries outside the city walls. And did you know that Cincinnati has been digging up Pompeii for over a decade? In fact it’s the largest area of Pompeii to be excavated in the past 200 years! We’ll show you what we’ve been discovering and learning about an entire neighborhood of the city.

SHERD NERDS: TRACING THE HISTORY OF ROME THROUGH ITS CERAMIC EVIDENCE
Sarah Wenner, Ph.D. Student
Wherever the archaeological site, whatever the time period, chances are the majority of the material remains uncovered will be pottery. This is certainly the case for an excavation focused on the Roman world, where the pieces range from transport vessels to elegant dishes. But how do archaeologists study these broken pieces? How can they tell a larger historical story? Join me – a “sherd nerd” who has participated in excavations in both Israel and Italy – as I explain how pottery was produced, moved and used around the Mediterranean. We will also dig in to the ongoing excavations at the Porta Stabia project at Pompeii to see how pottery is removed, sorted and studied.

ANCIENT VILLAGERS AND CITY SLICKERS
Sarah Wenner, Ph.D. Student
What was it like to live in the past? This presentation brings to life the space and everyday activities of ancient farmers and urbanites. How did an ancient farm work and what kind of jobs did farmers do every day? How can we get at the sights and sounds of living in an ancient city like Athens or Rome, and what did urbanites do to make a living? We will see how archaeologists use the trash of the past to answer these questions. This presentation will step into ancient farmhouses and giant apartment buildings. The secrets of good shepherding and the sales tricks of urban shopkeepers will be revealed. But it won't be all hard work, because the ancients knew how to have fun too!

WHAT DO ARCHAEOLOGISTS DO, ANYWAY?
Shelby Raynor, Ph.D. Student
This presentation explores the work of archaeologists and our place in society. The word “archaeologist” usually brings up images of Indiana Jones, treasure-hunting, or reanimated mummies. Real archaeology is not usually so Hollywood-friendly, but the field is full of both dangers and rewards. We will first discuss the goals of archaeology and how this discipline has contributed to our understanding of human history. We will then consider exactly what archaeologists do, including excavation, laboratory work, and experiments. We will look at a typical day on an excavation, including work, meals, accommodations, and recreation. Finally we will explore the role of archaeologists as advocates for the protection of our past.

THE CENTURIONS OF THE ROMAN ARMY: THE MEN UNDERNEATH THE ARMOR
CJ Miller, Ph.D. Student
Meet the Roman centurion: one of the most iconic figures from antiquity. The success of the Roman army was legendary and the centurions were the key to this success. They kept ranks, kept order, and kept cooler heads in combat. Yet, these famous soldiers were more than simply military machines. This talk will discuss evidence from ancient inscriptions and literature (including the New Testament) to reveal the real men underneath the armor.

ANCIENT ART FROM THE UC CLASSICS STUDY COLLECTION
Carol Hershenson, PhD student and Curator of the Classics Study Collection
Get up close and personal with genuine objects of ancient art! This presentation brings a selection of artifacts from the Classics Study Collection to your classroom and community to encourage a hands-on discussion of their place in Greek art and society. We’ll consider the full life of the piece of ‘art’, including its creation utilizing local resources, the techniques of producing Greek pottery (illustrated with actual examples), a discussion of “What is Art?”, and an exercise on how archaeologists learn from these fragments of the past. Students and residents have the opportunity to handle the artifacts, and to examine our finest vases more closely than they will ever see them in a museum.

A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO FOUNTAIN SQUARE: ROME AND THE ROOTS OF THE MODERN CITY
Jeff Banks, Ph.D. Student
If an ancient Roman traveled to modern-day Cincinnati, what would he or she think? Certainly the technology would be shocking, but in many ways, both cities have much in common. Indeed, modern cities trace their roots back to the ancient Greek "polis" and the Roman "civitas," including governmental structures and entertainment facilities. With Rome and Cincinnati, however, the similarities are all the more striking. Let's take a walk along the Ohio and Tiber rivers, comparing the many buildings in terms of their architecture, arrangement and the different functions they play (for example: the Colosseum and Paul Brown Stadium!). We will discover how alike the modern city and its citizens are to the ancient civitas.

Upcoming Events

Sarah Wenner PhD Defense 308 Blegen

Date: 01.13.2023 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Calendar: Public Events

Save for dissertation defense

Date: 03.03.2023 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Calendar: Public Events

Hold for visiting speaker D. Libatique

Date: 03.20.2023 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
Calendar: Public Events

Latest News

  • Visiting Scholar Applications Open!

    Graphic of the Blegen Library Building

    Applications for the Tytus Fellowship and Cincinnati Summer Residencies are open!

    Use the correct online form for each application (see the links above). The deadline for applications is March 1, 2023.

    Senior scholars are invited to apply for the Margo Tytus Visiting Scholars Program. Applicants for this program will ordinarily be a minimum of five years beyond receipt of the Ph.D., with notable publication histories. Tytus Scholars are expected to be in residence at the University of Cincinnati for a minimum of one semester (ca. four months) and a maximum of two during the regular academic year; see UC Academic Calendar. In exceptional circumstances, Tytus Scholars may be appointed for a shorter term (one to two months) during the regular academic year. Tytus Scholars will receive a monthly stipend of $1,500 plus housing near campus and a transportation allowance, as well as office space attached to the Burnam Classics Library.

    More recent PhDs and other scholars who would benefit from the use of a world-class classics library are invited to apply for the Cincinnati Summer Residency program. Applicants for this program will have their Ph.D. in hand by the time of application, and will ordinarily be in residence at the University of Cincinnati for approximately two months in the summer terms, May to mid-August; see UC Academic Calendar. Cincinnati Summer Residents will receive housing near campus and office space attached to the Burnam Classics Library. Residents are not eligible for a stipend or travel reimbursement.

     
  • Now Accepting Undergraduate Scholarship Applications

    The Department of Classics is now accepting applications for Semple Scholarships and its new Centennial Scholarships for the upcoming 2023-2024 academic year. 
     
    For more details on these two undergraduate scholarship opportunities, please see the departmental scholarship page.
     
    The application process is fully electronic this year. Use our online form.
     
    The deadline for both scholarship applications is Jan 27, 2023.
     
  • Job Posting for Assistant Professor in Roman History 2022

    The Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati invites applications for a tenure track position in Ancient History with a research specialization in Roman Republican and/or Imperial history at the level of Assistant Professor, to begin August 15, 2023.

    Details can be found at the UC Jobs website. Applications are currently being reviewed but the position will remain open until filled.

     
  • Professor Shannon-Henderson Competes on Jeopardy!

    Kelly Shannon-Henderson stands with Ken Jennings on the set of Jeopardy!
    Faculty member Kelly Shannon-Henderson with Jeopardy! host Ken Jennings

    UC Classics' very own Kelly Shannon-Henderson appeared as a contestant on Jeopardy! on Tuesday, September 20, 2022. After navigating a multi-stage selection process, Dr. Shannon-Henderson got the call this summer offering her a spot on the show, and traveled to Los Angeles to film. "I'd wanted to be on Jeopardy! ever since I was a kid," she said, "so it was hugely exciting and a great privilege to get the chance to do so. Being a contestant was a fantastic experience."