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Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • Pictish Hillfort Unearthed in Central Scotland

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Feb 13, 2020 | 23:37 pm

    Pictish Hillfort Unearthed in Central Scotland DUNKELD, SCOTLAND— reports that a team of archaeologists and volunteers in central Scotland has excavated the site of a hilltop fort thought to have been inhabited by Pictish elites between the seventh and ninth centuries A.D. The researchers uncovered pottery imported from Europe, Anglo-Saxon glass beads, and pieces of Roman glass that had been recycled into gaming pieces, in addition to spindle whorls for spinning thread, crucibles and molds for working metal, and whetstones for sharpening cutting tools. “There must have been a lot of iron and other metal working going on here making the site an important center for production—not[…]

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  • Prehistoric Clay Coffin Burials Uncovered in Northern Egypt

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Feb 13, 2020 | 23:03 pm

    Prehistoric Clay Coffin Burials Uncovered in Northern Egypt CAIRO, EGYPT—Ahram Online reports that 83 graves dated to the first half of the fourth millennium B.C. have been discovered in the Nile Delta to the northeast of Cairo. Mostafa Waziri of the Supreme Council of Antiquities said the burials belonged to the Naqada III period, and feature clay coffins and cylindrical jars. Archaeologists expect to uncover additional graves at the site. To read about thirty-six mummies of laborers unearthed at the necropolis of the ancient city of Memphis, go to "Saqqara's Working Stiffs."

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  • Can Volcanoes Help Researchers Date Australian Oral Traditions?

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Feb 13, 2020 | 00:28 am

    Can Volcanoes Help Researchers Date Australian Oral Traditions? VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA—Science Magazine reports that geologist Erin Matchan of the University of Melbourne and her colleagues have dated volcanic rocks at southeastern Australia’s Budj Bim Volcanic Complex and the Tower Hill volcano, which is located about 25 miles away, to about 37,000 years ago. In the 1940s, archaeologists discovered a stone ax underneath the volcanic rocks at the Tower Hill volcano, indicating that people lived in the region before the eruptions occurred. Matchan explained that the structure of the volcanoes suggests they grew their peaks within a period spanning just days to months. The researchers think an ancient story told[…]

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  • Colorado Petroglyphs Mapped With High-Tech Tools

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Feb 12, 2020 | 23:58 pm

    Colorado Petroglyphs Mapped With High-Tech Tools KRAKÓW, POLAND—According to a Live Science report, researchers led by archaeologist Radosław Palonka of Jagiellonian University employed laser scanning and photogrammetry to create highly detailed 3-D models of 800-year-old artworks inscribed on rock surfaces at southwestern Colorado’s Castle Rock Pueblo. At sunset on days around the time of the midwinter solstice and the spring and fall equinoxes, Palonka explained, the sunlight and shadows appear to move through the carved spirals and grooves of the petroglyphs. The researchers also noted that similar petroglyphs at nearby Sand Canyon are illuminated in the morning and early afternoons around the time of the summer[…]

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  • Possible African-American Burials Unearthed in Washington, D.C.

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Feb 12, 2020 | 23:35 pm

    Possible African-American Burials Unearthed in Washington, D.C. WASHINGTON, D.C.—According to a DCist report, workers renovating the basement of a Georgetown townhouse discovered human remains thought to date to the early nineteenth century. City archaeologist Ruth Trocolli said the site may have been part of an unrecorded cemetery on the block, since other human remains have been recovered during construction projects in the past. Jerry McCoy of the D.C. Public Library said one of the graves might belong to Yarrow Mamout, who is also known as “Old Yarrow” from portraits painted by James Alexander Simpson and Charles Willson Peale. Mamout, a Muslim, was kidnapped in West Africa, enslaved[…]

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