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Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • Carbonized Cake Recovered in Germany

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Oct 24, 2021 | 23:03 pm

    Carbonized Cake Recovered in Germany LÜBECK, GERMANY—A cake baked 79 years ago has been found in the Old Town district of the city of Lübeck, which is located near the coast of northern Germany, according to a Live Science report. Dirk Rieger of the Hanseatic City of Lübeck Historic Monuments Protection Authority said that the city, although a non-military target, was bombed by the British Royal Air Force on the night of March 28, 1942, in retaliation for the Nazi blitz of Coventry, England, in 1940. The cake was found in the remains of a building that collapsed into its cellar during the air raid.[…]

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  • Study Suggests Humans Did Not Wipe Out Woolly Mammoths

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Oct 24, 2021 | 23:02 pm

    Study Suggests Humans Did Not Wipe Out Woolly Mammoths CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND—According to a statement released by the University of Cambridge, humans did not cause the extinction of the woolly mammoths, even though they are known to have hunted mammoths for food and used the skeletons and hides for shelter, weapons, and artwork. Eske Willerslev of St. John’s College and the University of Copenhagen, Yucheng Wang of the University of Cambridge, and their colleagues analyzed DNA recovered from soil samples taken from Arctic areas where mammoth remains have been found. The DNA came from plant and animal remains, including urine, feces, and skin cells. The researchers also sequenced the DNA[…]

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  • Wari Burials Unearthed in Northern Peru

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Oct 24, 2021 | 23:00 pm

    LIMA, PERU—According to an AFP report, the remains of 29 people have been discovered at Huaca Santa Rosa de Pucala, a ceremonial center built between A.D. 800 and 900 in northern Peru’s coastal region of Lambayeque. Twenty-five of the burials, dating from A.D. 100 to 700, belong to the Moche culture. These remains had been placed in clay tombs and burial chambers, along with pottery and the remains of llamas, alpacas, and guinea pigs. The remaining four burials contain the remains of three children and a teenager of the Wari culture, which flourished in the central Peruvian Andes between the[…]

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  • Pigmented Shell Bead in Japan Dated to Paleolithic Period

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Oct 24, 2021 | 22:59 pm

    NAHA, JAPAN—The Mainichi reports that a bead made of shell and red iron oxide pigment recovered from Sakitari-do Cave in southern Okinawa has been dated to 23,000 years ago by researchers at the Okinawa Prefectural Museum and Art Museum. The bead measures about one-half inch long and one-third inch wide. Fishhooks made of shell and other shell beads were also recovered at the site. Objects crafted during the Jomon period, some 15,000 years ago, had previously been Japan’s oldest-known artifacts to have been decorated with pigments. For more on the shell fishhooks from Sakitari, go to "Japan's Early Anglers."

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  • Prehistoric Phallus-Shaped Pillars Found in Turkey

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Oct 22, 2021 | 00:14 am

    ISTANBUL, TURKEY—According to a Live Science report, archaeologists led by Necmi Karul of Istanbul University uncovered 11 pillars and a carving shaped like a human head in a building at the 11,000-year-old site of Karahan Tepe, which is located in southeastern Turkey. “All pillars are erected and shaped like a phallus,” Karul said. The building where the pillars were found was connected to three other structures and may have been part of a ceremonial complex, he explained. People could have entered at one end of the complex, moved past the carvings, and exited at the other end. The buildings were[…]

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