wordsonly

A+ A A-

Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • 17th-Century Coin Unearthed at a Castle in Slovakia

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Aug 11, 2022 | 21:25 pm

    PRIEVIDZA, SLOVAKIA—According to a report in The Slovak Spectator, a seventeenth-century coin, pottery, and a knife were uncovered in the area where the gates once stood at Sivý Kameň, a castle on the Nitra River in west-central Slovakia. Archaeologist Dominika Andreánska said that the castle was built in the fourteenth century, but by the late seventeenth century was being used as a prison. Her team, she added, identified the gate area from old photographs of the castle ruins. The coin, a denarius, was minted in 1679 in central Slovakia during the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Leopold I. “It is[…]

    Read more...
  • Rock Crystals Recovered from Neolithic Burial Mound in England

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Aug 11, 2022 | 21:06 pm

    Rock Crystals Recovered from Neolithic Burial Mound in England MANCHESTER, ENGLAND—According to a statement released by the University of Manchester, transparent rock crystals have been recovered from Neolithic burial mounds at Dorstone Hill in England’s West Midlands. Researchers including Nick Overton of the University of Manchester and his colleagues from the University of Cardiff and Herefordshire County Council found that the rock crystal had been knapped in the same manner as flint recovered from the site, but it had not been used as tools, such as arrowheads or scrapers. Rather, the worked rock crystal was deposited in the mounds over a period of about 300 years, along with pottery,[…]

    Read more...
  • Pathogens Detected in Bronze Age Remains in Greece

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Aug 11, 2022 | 20:35 pm

    JENA, GERMANY—Phys.org reports that a study of genetic material recovered from the teeth of people buried in the Hagios Charalambos cave on the Greek island of Crete between about 2290 and 1909 B.C. detected the presence of extinct strains of two pathogens. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, the British School at Athens, and Temple University suggest that epidemics brought about by Y. pestis, which causes plague, and S. enterica, which causes typhoid fever, could have contributed to the collapse of Egypt’s Old Kingdom and the Akkadian[…]

    Read more...
  • Sleeve Buttons Unearthed at Colonial Michilimackinac

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Aug 10, 2022 | 23:23 pm

    Sleeve Buttons Unearthed at Colonial Michilimackinac MACKINAC ISLAND, MICHIGAN—WXYZ Detroit reports that a set of sleeve buttons have been discovered at Colonial Michilimackinac, the site of an eighteenth-century fortified trading post situated on the Straits of Mackinac. Archaeologist Lynn Evans said the joined sleeve buttons, made of green glass paste “stones” set in brass, would have functioned like a modern cufflink. The sleeve buttons, she added, were recovered from a layer of demolition rubble in a rowhouse dated to 1781. To read about sunken ships off Michigan's northeastern coast, go to "Shipwreck Alley."

    Read more...
  • Roman Coins and Votive Offerings Recovered from Hot Springs

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Aug 10, 2022 | 23:07 pm

    Roman Coins and Votive Offerings Recovered from Hot Springs TUSCANY, ITALY—CNN reports that excavators working in central Italy near the village of San Casciano dei Bagni discovered statuettes and coins thought to have been left behind by Roman visitors to an ancient Etruscan pool fed by hot springs. The objects may have been offered to the gods believed to have provided the hot water in thanks for relief from respiratory problems and aches and pains, according to Jacopo Tabolli of Siena’s University for Foreigners. Some 700 of the 3,000 coins are still shiny, he added, and may have been thrown into the baths in the third century A.D. by[…]

    Read more...