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Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • Seventh-Century Shipwreck Excavated in Israel

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 30, 2020 | 23:11 pm

    Seventh-Century Shipwreck Excavated in Israel HAIFA, ISRAEL—Exploration of a 1,300-year-old shipwreck just off the coast of Israel is offering new insights into life in the region at a time of transition from Byzantine to Islamic rule, according to a report from The Jerusalem Post. Researchers from the University of Haifa’s Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies began excavating the wreck in 2016. They have found that its cargo included more than 100 amphoras filled with products including olives, dates, figs, fish, pine nuts, grapes, and raisins. The researchers believe the ship made stops in Cyprus, Egypt, and possibly at a port along the coast of[…]

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  • Study Warns of Deteriorating Peat Bog Preservation

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 30, 2020 | 22:24 pm

    Study Warns of Deteriorating Peat Bog Preservation LUND, SWEDEN—According to a Science Magazine report, researchers led by Adam Boethius of Lund University found that preservation conditions at a Mesolithic site in southern Sweden have deteriorated significantly in the 75 years since excavations first began there. Ageröd is one of many peat bog sites whose anaerobic conditions have preserved bone, teeth, antler fragments, and other artifacts for more than 8,000 years. In 2019, Boethius and his colleagues dug five test pits in areas of the bog that had yielded significant amounts of organic matter during previous excavations in the 1940s and 1970s. Comparing the newly recovered material to[…]

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  • Medieval Remains Unearthed on Shetland Islands

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 30, 2020 | 20:42 pm

    SHETLAND, SCOTLAND—The Scotsman reports that the remains of 26 people who were buried some 500 to 600 years ago have been discovered in the front yard of a home on the main island of Shetland. It’s rare for bones to survive in the island’s soil, which means the remains will give researchers a unique look at the population of the Shetland Islands during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Archaeologist Val Turner of the Shetland Amenity Trust notes that it has long been assumed that most of the people living in the islands at that time were of Viking origin, but that[…]

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  • New Clues to Location of Lost WWII Australian Ship

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 29, 2020 | 23:57 pm

    New Clues to Location of Lost WWII Australian Ship DARWIN, AUSTRALIA—A crooked piece of wood found on a beach in Australia’s Wessel Islands may be part of a storied World War II ship, according to a report from ABC Radio Darwin. HMAS Patricia Cam, a converted coal ship whose wartime mission involved delivering codebooks to remote coastguard stations, was bombed, strafed, and sunk by a Japanese seaplane on January 22, 1943. The ship had 25 people onboard, including a reverend who was taken hostage by the Japanese and eventually beheaded. Several others died in the bombing or later that day, but 16 survivors made it to a tiny unnamed[…]

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  • Roman Fort Identified in Northern England

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 29, 2020 | 23:57 pm

    Roman Fort Identified in Northern England BURSCOUGH, ENGLAND—Lancs Live reports that the site of a first-century A.D. Roman fort in northwestern England has received official recognition from Historic England, a government body dedicated to historic preservation. Aerial photos and both geophysical and lidar surveys have revealed clear traces of earthworks at the site, as well as a gateway with double gate towers and traces of a Roman-era road approaching the fort from the south and east. Excavations lead by archaeologist Stephen Baldwin of The Fort in the Wood Project have also revealed a large stone building within the fort that researchers believe is a Roman granary.[…]

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