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Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • New Dates for Canterbury Cathedral’s Medieval Stained Glass

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 26, 2021 | 22:33 pm

    New Dates for Canterbury Cathedral’s Medieval Stained Glass CANTERBURY, ENGLAND—BBC News reports that stained glass windows over the south entrance of Canterbury Cathedral, which depict the ancestors of Christ, have been re-dated to the mid-twelfth century using a new, non-destructive technique. Conservator Léonie Seliger and her colleagues used a device called a windolyser to shine a beam on the surface of the glass. Spectrometry was then used to analyze the chemical fingerprint of the glass and calculate its age. The new dates indicate that the windows may have been in place when Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, was assassinated in the cathedral in 1170 by four knights who[…]

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  • Smuggled Old Kingdom Statue Returned to Egypt

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 26, 2021 | 21:58 pm

    Smuggled Old Kingdom Statue Returned to Egypt CAIRO, EGYPT—According to an Ahram Online report, an Old Kingdom statue depicting the priest Nikau-Ptah has been returned to Egypt from an art gallery in the Netherlands. Nikau-Ptah is shown standing and wearing a short skirt, although the statue’s legs are missing. The priest’s name was engraved on the sculpture’s right hand. Shaaban Abdel-Gawad of Egypt’s Antiquities Repatriation Department said the statue had been illegally excavated and smuggled out of Egypt. To read about the sacred site of Heliopolis on the Nile, go to "Egypt's Eternal City."

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  • Inscription With Image of Babylonian King Found in Saudi Arabia

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 25, 2021 | 21:35 pm

    RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA—Live Science reports that a 2,550-year-old inscription has been discovered on a piece of basalt in the Hail region of northern Saudia Arabia. Nabonidus, the last king of Babylon, is shown holding a scepter at the top of the engraving, along with a snake, a flower, and the moon. These images are thought to have been used as symbols with religious meaning. The lines of cuneiform text following the images are being translated and may offer new information about the king. Nabonidus is known to have ruled the Babylonian Empire from 555 to 539 B.C. At the beginning[…]

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  • New Thoughts on Early Human Dentition

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 25, 2021 | 21:15 pm

    DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND—According to a statement released by the University of Otago, biological anthropologist Ian Towle and dentist Carolina Loch examined more than 20,000 teeth from fossils and living primates and noted the position and size of any tooth fractures for clues to the diets of early humans. The researchers found that extreme tooth wear and high rates of tooth fractures were normal within the Homo genus, similar to the rate of tooth fracture found in living primates who eat a diet of hard foods. Paranthropus robustus, a human relative that lived about three million years ago, had been thought[…]

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  • Rock-Cut Chambers Unearthed in Turkey’s House of the Muses

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 22, 2021 | 23:15 pm

    GAZIANTEP, TURKEY—Hurriyet Daily News reports that two rock-cut chambers thought to have been used as dining rooms have been discovered in the so-called “House of the Muses,” which is located in southeastern Anatolia’s ancient city of Zeugma. The building is known for its decorative mosaic floors, and named for one consisting of portraits of the nine muses. Archaeologist Kutalmiş Görkay said work to reinforce the chambers after they were emptied of earthen fill continues. “In particular, there are risky cracks on the ceilings in the chamber,” Görkay explained. For more on Zeugma, go to "Zeugma After the Flood."

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