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Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • Mystery Smudge from Polar Explorer’s Diary Analyzed

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 2, 2020 | 22:31 pm

    Mystery Smudge from Polar Explorer’s Diary Analyzed ODENSE, DENMARK—Live Science reports that Kaare Lund Rasmussen of the University of Southern Denmark and his colleagues employed X-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to analyze the chemical composition of a black spot found in the diary of Jørgen Brønlund, a member of a three-man expedition to Greenland’s Northeast Coast begun in 1906. Brønlund, an Inuit who had been born in Greenland, was the last survivor of the Denmark Expedition team when he too succumbed to frostbite and starvation in November 1907 on the return trip to base camp. The last page of his diary, which was recovered[…]

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  • Scientists Evaluate Effect of Volcanic Ash on Pompeii’s Murals

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 2, 2020 | 22:03 pm

    Scientists Evaluate Effect of Volcanic Ash on Pompeii’s Murals LEIOA, SPAIN—According to a statement released by the University of the Basque Country, a team of archaeologists and chemists analyzed wall paintings at Pompeii’s House of Marcus Lucretius, the House of Ariadne, and the House of the Golden Cupids. The murals in these structures were covered with pyroclastic materials when Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79 and buried the Roman city. Although the layer of ash has preserved the artwork for the past 2,000 years, the researchers found that ions in the pyroclastic materials combine with underground water and promote the crystallization of damaging salts on the artworks when they[…]

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  • Excavation in Western Turkey Reveals 2,000-Year-Old Sculpture

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 1, 2020 | 23:53 pm

    DENIZLI, TURKEY—Hurriyet Daily News reports that a fragment of a sculpture depicting the head of a priest has been unearthed in the large ancient city of Laodicea, which is located in western Turkey. Celal Şimşek of Pamukkale University said the 2,000-year-old portrait was found near the city’s western theater, among the rubble of buildings destroyed by earthquakes. To read about an ancient marble head of Dionysus found in Rome, go to "A God Goes Shopping."

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  • Altar Dedicated to Pan Unearthed in Golan Heights

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 1, 2020 | 23:35 pm

    Altar Dedicated to Pan Unearthed in Golan Heights HAIFA, ISRAEL—Haaretz reports that an 1,800-year-old altar was found in the limestone walls of a Christian church in the seventh century A.D. Once known as Paneas, the site is located in what is now the Banias Nature Reserve. An inscription on the volcanic basalt altar indicates that it was dedicated to Pan Heliopolitanos, a Greek deity with the characteristics of Pan and Zeus. “The wall is made of small simple stones and there’s this one great big stone,” said Adi Erlich of the University of Haifa. The carving was situated in the wall so that it would not be visible[…]

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  • Three Settlements Unearthed in Southern Bulgaria

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Nov 30, 2020 | 23:25 pm

    RADNEVO, BULGARIA—Archaeology in Bulgaria reports that an early Thracian settlement dated to about 1000 B.C., a Roman town dated to about A.D. 200 to 400, and a settlement occupied from the early Byzantine through the medieval periods were uncovered in southern Bulgaria on land slated for coal mining. Dwellings, industrial buildings, figurines, pottery, spindle whorls, loom weights, millstones, stone tools, and human remains buried in ritual pits were found at the site of the early Thracian settlement. A bronze statue depicting the goddess Athena was uncovered on the edges of the Roman town, in addition to coins, pottery, and bricks.[…]

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