Department of ClassicsUniversity of Cincinnati
Department of Classics

CLAS7001 Greek History

This course focuses on the primary sources for some of the major events in Greek history from the archaic period to the Hellenistic period. Students will read and analyze English translations of ancient Greek literature and inscriptions. They will then immerse themselves in the historical problems raised by these sources and addressed in secondary literature.

CLAS7002 Roman History

This course covers the main problems in Roman history between the origins of Rome and the end of the second century CE and introduces students to the relevant historical methodologies. These include: the formation of the Republic, the senatorial oligarchy, the role of the citizen in the political process, the expansion of Rome in Italy and then throughout the Mediterranean and beyond, Rome's relation with her Italian allies, the fall of the Republic and the establishment of the Principate, and the development of imperial administration in the provinces.

CLAS7003 Jewish and Christian History

This course covers the main problems in Jewish and Christian history and literature from the Hellenistic period to the end of the fourth century CE and introduces students to the relevant historical and literary methodologies. These problems include: the Hellenization of Jews in the diaspora, the Septuagint, the troublesome relations between the Jewish communities and the Roman authorities, the works of Philo and Josephus, the origins of Christianity, the composition of the New Testament, the early church, its organization and doctrines, the persecutions from Nero to the tetrachs, the parting of the ways between Judaism and Christianity, early Greek and Latin church fathers, the development of normative and authoritarian Christianity after Constantine, and the later Greek and Latin church fathers.

CLAS7005 Greek Documents

Reading course on ancient Greek documents preserved on stone. The texts include Athenian decrees of the fifth and fourth century BCE (e.g. the tribute quota lists of the Athenian empire and building accounts for the great Periclean monuments) and examples of royal correspondence between Hellenistic Greek kings and various Greek cities.

CLAS7006 Greek Papyri

Introduction to the study of Greek papyrus texts from the third century BCE to Late Antiquity. The focus will be on the palaeography of papyrus texts over time and their use as historical evidence for the Hellenistic and Roman world. Subjects include: ancient manuscript evidence for known and unknown Greek literary works; non-literary, standard Greek; public and private documents; the range of legal instruments; the economy and society of Graeco-Roman Egypt; ancient people underrepresented in other sources (women, the rural population, provincials generally).

CLAS7007 Latin Documents

Introduction to the study of Latin inscriptions from the second century BCE to Late Antiquity. The focus will be on the palaeography of inscriptions over time and their use as historical evidence for Italy in the time of the Republic, for the early Empire, and for Roman "provincial" culture. Subjects include: epigrams and other poems; non-literary, "vulgar" Latin; the range of public and private documents; the distinct "epigraphies" in Roman provinces or even within Italy; the society of small towns as opposed to Rome; ancient people underrepresented in other sources (freedmen, common soldiers, provincials generally).

CLAS7011 Prehistory 1

This is the firstpart of a two-part intensive survey of the prehistoric culture in the Greek world (the Aegean and Cyprus). During the course we will review theoretical and methodological approaches to Greek, Minoan, or Cypriot archaeology from the Palaeolithic period to the Middle Bronze Age.

CLAS7012 Prehistory 2

This is the second part of a two-part intensive survey of the prehistoric culture in the Greek world (the Aegean and Cyprus). This survey will cover the Late Bronze Age, the most flourishing prehistoric period in the Aegean. The emergence of the great Bronze Age palaces in Crete, the Mycenaean citadels in the Greek mainland, and economic centers in Cyprus will be studied. Economy, administration, religion, and society will be examined in the light of Linear B (the most ancient Greek) texts and the remains of the material culture. The development of trade and far-reaching foreign relations will be analyzed. We will study the art of the period (wall-painting, ceramics and seals) and identify changes and innovations. Previous and recent theories concerning relations between the Mycenaean states, Crete, and Cyprus will be critiqued and evaluated and the chronological framework for the period (critical for the reconstruction of the history) will be assessed.

CLAS7013 Greek Archaeology 1

The first of a two-part intensive survey of the material culture of the Ancient Greek world in the Iron Age and Archaic periods (ca. 1000-480 BC). The course will examine the archaeological evidence for civic, sacred, and domestic activities and will consider the development of architectural, sculptural, and ceramic forms throughout the period in order to understand how material culture both reflects and shapes cultural identity. Various methodological approaches and theoretical models will be introduced.

CLAS7014 Greek Archaeology 2

The second of a two-part intensive survey of the material culture of the Ancient Greek world in the Classical and Hellenistic periods (ca. 480-31 BC). The course will examine the archaeological evidence for civic, sacred, and domestic activities and will consider the development of architectural, sculptural, and ceramic forms throughout the period in order to understand how material culture both reflects and shapes cultural identity. Special attention will be paid to the definition of "Classical" Greek culture and its re-definition in the Hellenistic period. Various methodological approaches and theoretical models will be introduced.

CLAS7015 Roman Archaeology 1

This is the first of a two-part intensive survey of the material culture of the Roman world, with a focus on the first millennium BC.   We will examine the various archaeological approaches taken to topics such as the foundation and early development of Rome in the regal period; the identities of, and cultural exchanges between, the Villanovans, Etruscans, Samnites, Romans, and other Italic groups; the Roman conquest of Italy and the Mediterranean during the Republican period; and the methodological and theoretical frameworks within which Roman archaeologists have examined the art and archaeology of the first millennium BC.

CLAS7016 Roman Archaeology 2

This is the second of a two-part intensive survey of the material culture of the Roman world, with an historical focus on the first 500 years AD. We will examine the various archaeological approaches taken to topics such as the creation of an Empire; the identities of, and cultural exchanges between, the Romans and their conquered nations; life in the Roman provinces; the collapse of an empire; the rise of Christianity; and the methodological and theoretical frameworks within which Roman archaeologists have examined the art and archaeology of the first half of the first millennium AD.

CLAS7021 Historical Linguistics

Study of the linguistic nature and development of Greek and Latin. The methodology of historical linguistics is to analyze the phonology and morphology of Greek and Latin in comparison with other Indo-European languages, especially Sanskrit, in order to understand the patterns of linguistic change that produced the received forms of the languages. This course requires a graduate-level knowledge of Greek and Latin.

CLAS7022 Literary Theory

A survey of modern literary theories as they pertain to the interpretation of Greek and Latin texts. The theoretical approaches covered will include such categories as American new criticism; French structuralism, semiotics, and poststructuralism; psychoanalytic interpretation; Marxism, feminism, gender studies, and postcolonialism; Russian formulism, reader-response criticism, and narratology; new historicism and cultural studies. The course requires intensive reading in modern theoretical texts, oral and written discussion and analysis of these texts, and oral and written application to ancient authors. A graduate-level capacity in Greek and/or Latin texts is required.

CLAS7031 IT for Archaeologists

This course prepares students to use computers and information technologies effectively in archaeological research, including database design and integration with spatial data through GIS.

CLAS7032 Archaeological Theory

This course prepares students to effectively engage in theoretical and methodological approaches to archaeological research.  We will examine the histories of theory and method in archaeology, outline the contributions that these approaches have made to the discipline, and apply a range of them to various case studies across Prehistoric, Greek, and Roman archaeology.

CLAS8005 Directed Readings

Reading under the supervision of a faculty member of primary sources and secondary literature on an area of historical, archaeological, or philological study not covered in a regularly scheduled course that the student could take instead but essential to the progress of the student.

CLAS8006 MA Thesis

M.A. thesis writing under the supervision of one or more faculty members. The focus will be on producing a defendable MA thesis. Subjects include: formulating a topic; researching primary and secondary source material; producing an outline; writing chapters and revising them; finalizing the typescript.

CLAS8007 PHD Dissertation

PhD dissertation research and writing under the supervision of one or more faculty members. The focus will be on producing a defendable PhD dissertation in the last semester 15CLAS8007 is taken. Subjects include: formulating a topic and an original working hypothesis; researching primary and secondary source material; producing an outline; writing chapters and revising them; supporting original conclusions with new or newly interpreted evidence; finalizing the typescript in the last semester 15CLAS8007 is taken.

CLAS9001 History Seminar

Each ancient history seminar focuses on a key period and/or region of the ancient Greek and Roman world. Students write short reports (e.g. reviews of recently published secondary literature dealing with the subject of the seminar) as well as a final paper. The latter, usually 20-25 pages long, is an in-depth investigation of a topic that is of particular interest to the student.

CLAS9011 Prehistory Seminar

This is an intensive seminar on Aegean Prehistory. Topics will change every year, but will relate to past and current theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of Aegean Prehistory from 7000 until 700 BCE.  Emphasis will be given to new data and analysis of current themes in Aegean Prehistory.

CLAS9012 Greek Archaeology Seminar

An intensive seminar on a topic of Greek Archaeology from the period of ca. 1000-31 BC. The focus will change every year, but each seminar will examine a topic of Greek material culture in depth in order to understand how it relates to Greek cultural definition. Various theoretical and methodological approaches will be presented.

CLAS9013 Roman Archaeology Seminar

This course is an intensive seminar on Roman Archaeology. The topical focus will change each year, but will always relate to contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to Roman material culture from approximately 1000 BC until 500 AD.

CLAS9014 Diachronic Archaeology Seminar

This is a series of advanced graduate seminars (with topics changing from year to year) which focus on a single theoretically informed topic in the archaeology of the Mediterranean to discuss, analyze, critique, and debate its application to spatially and temporally diverse case studies. The seminars are intentionally designed to go beyond the disciplinary boundaries of Prehistoric, Greek, and Roman archaeology. Seminars will often be team-taught.

GRK6001 Tragedy 1

Reading of three of the earlier Greek tragedies, typically the plays of both Aeschylus and Sophocles. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the literary issues connected with Attic tragedy. Students are expected to consult standard commentaries on a regular basis and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6002 Philosophy

Reading of major works of Greek philosophical prose, such as Plato or Aristotle, typically about ten OCT pages a week.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations and discussion of the literary and philosophical issues raised by the texts read. Students are expected to consult standard commentaries on a regular basis and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6003 Lyric etc.

Reading of selections from early Greek lyric, elegiac, and iambic poetry, such the selections in Campbell and some Pindar.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the literary issues connected with archaic Greek poetry.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries on a regular basis and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6004 Attic Orators

Reading of one or more of the Attic orators, typically about ten OCT pages a week.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with Greek oratory in its historical and literary setting.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6005 Tragedy 2

Reading of three of the later Greek tragedies, typically plays of both Sophocles and Euripides. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the literary issues connected with Attic tragedy. Students are expected to read standard commentaries and some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6006 Thucydides

Reading of approximately two books of Thucydides.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of Thucydides' literary style and the issues connected with his writings in their historical, literary, and intellectual setting.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6007 Comedy

Reading of three comedies by Aristophanes, or Aristophanes and Menander. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the literary and social issues connected with Attic comedy. Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6008 Hellenistic Poetry

Reading of a selection of Hellenistic poetry, with a focus on major poets such as Callimachus, Theocritus, and Apollonius of Rhodes. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the literary and aesthetic issues connected with Hellenistic literature. Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK7011 Prose Composition

This course advances knowledge of ancient Greek prose through composition of complex sentences and paragraphs.  It includes study of the historical development of prose style through analysis of exemplary passages from prose authors.

GRK8001 Remedial

This course offers intermediate study to those students entering the graduate program who require additional preparation in Greek before undertaking graduate-level work.  It is designed to improve a student's knowledge of the Greek language and develop facility in translation, in preparation for entrance into 6000-level Greek courses.  This course does not count toward the graduate requirements in Greek.

GRK8005 Directed Readings

Directed readings offer a student the opportunity to engage in self-directed work in Greek, resulting in examination by a supervising faculty member.  Permission of the graduate advisor is required.

GRK9001 Seminar

The seminar prepares students to become research scholars in topics involving Greek language and literature.  It typically includes intensive reading of Greek texts from one author or genre or on a single subject, substantial reading in secondary sources, participation in discussion of ancient texts and modern interpretation of them, and development of oral reports and research papers.

LATN6001 Cicero

Reading of one or more of Cicero's rhetorical works, philosophical works, or speeches, typically about ten OCT pages a week. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with Cicero's writings in their historical, literary, and intellectual setting.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6002 Comedy

Reading of three plays by Plautus and Terence. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with Roman comedy as an adaptation of Greek new comedy to a Roman social setting. Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship. Attention will be paid to the meters of Roman comedy.

LATN6003 Tacitus

Reading of selections from Tacitus, typically about ten OCT pages a week.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with Tacitus' prose style and approach to writing history.  His writings will also be examined in their cultural, literary, and intellectual setting.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6004 Horace

Reading of selections from Horace's Odes and Satires. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of Horace's poetry.  Topics to be examined include Horace's place in the tradition of the lyric genre and of Roman satire, his relationship with Augustus and the circle of Maecenas, the style and character of his poetry. Students will be expected to consult standard commentaries and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6005 The Novel

Reading of Petronius' Satyricon or Apuleius' Golden Ass.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the nature of the ancient novel and its Roman development.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6006 Lucretius

Reading of a substantial selection of Lucretius' De Rerum Natura.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the philosophical and poetic issues connected with the poem.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6007 Silver Latin

Reading of selections from such Silver Age authors as Juvenal, Seneca, Pliny, Lucan, Martial, and Statius.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with the texts read in their historical, literary, and intellectual setting.  Students are expected to read standard commentaries and some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6008 Vergil, Eclogues and Georgics

Reading of Vergil's Eclogues and Georgics.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with Vergil's use of the pastoral and didactic genres in their literary and intellectual context.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN7011 Prose Composition

This course advances knowledge of Latin prose through composition of complex sentences and paragraphs.  It also includes study of the historical development of prose style through analysis of exemplary passages from various authors.

LATN8001 Remedial

This course offers intermediate study to those students entering the graduate program who require additional preparation in Latin before undertaking graduate-level work.  It is designed to improve a student's knowledge of the Latin language and develop facility in translation, in preparation for entrance into 6000-level Latin courses.  This course does not count toward the graduate requirements in Latin.

LATN8005 Directed Readings

Directed readings offer a student the opportunity to engage in independent work in Latin, resulting in examination by a supervising faculty member.  Permission of the graduate advisor is required.

LATN9001 Seminar

The seminar prepares students to become research scholars in topics involving Latin language and literature.  It typically includes intensive reading of Latin texts from one author or genre or on a single subject, substantial reading in secondary sources, participation in discussion of ancient texts and modern interpretation of them, and development of oral reports and research papers.