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Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • Battle of Waterloo Field Hospital Excavated

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 18, 2019 | 01:06 P

    Battle of Waterloo Field Hospital Excavated MONT-ST-JEAN, BELGIUM—The Guardian reports that the group Waterloo Uncovered, led by Tony Pollard of the University of Glasgow, has uncovered three human leg bones, one of which bears the marks of a surgeon’s saw, at the site of a farmhouse used as a field hospital on June 18, 1815, during the Battle of Waterloo. The field hospital served as many as 6,000 soldiers under the command of Britain’s Duke of Wellington who were wounded while fighting Napoleon Bonaparte’s French army. The excavators, some of whom are veterans themselves, also found musket balls fired by Brown Bess infantry muskets carried by[…]

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  • Restoration of King Tut’s Large Golden Coffin Begins

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 17, 2019 | 23:31 P

    Restoration of King Tut’s Large Golden Coffin Begins CAIRO, EGYPT—Ahram Online reports that the largest of King Tutankhuman’s three coffins has been removed from his tomb and transported to the new Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM), where it will be restored for the first time. This wooden coffin is the only one to have been stored in Tutankhamun’s tomb since its discovery in 1922. The smallest coffin, carved from gold, and the middle-sized one, like the largest made of wood coated with layers of gold plaster, were put on display in Cairo’s Egyptian Museum. Eissa Zidan, GEM's head of first aid restoration, said the repair of cracks in the[…]

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  • Roman Dwelling and Burial Found in Bulgaria

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 17, 2019 | 02:46 P

    PLOVDIV, BULGARIA—Archaeology in Bulgaria reports that a grave dated to the third or fourth century A.D. and an early Roman dwelling were found by utility workers in the city of Plovdiv. The city was occupied by the Thracians and known as Philipopolis, after King Philip II of Macedon, until the first century A.D., when the Romans conquered the region and renamed the city Trimontium. Archaeologist Maya Martinova of the Plovdiv Museum of Archaeology said the dwelling was in a neighborhood left outside a fortress wall built around the city by the Romans in A.D. 172. The land eventually became the[…]

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  • Neolithic Settlement Discovered in Israel

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 17, 2019 | 02:01 P

    Neolithic Settlement Discovered in Israel MOTZA, ISRAEL—Reuters reports that a 9,000-year-old settlement estimated to have covered dozens of acres of land has been discovered near Jerusalem. As many as 2,000 to 3,000 people once lived at the site, according to researchers from the Israel Antiquities Authority. Large buildings, alleyways, and storage sheds full of legumes and seeds have been uncovered. Bones from the site suggest the residents kept sheep in addition to planting lentils and other crops. Arrowheads, axes, sickle blades, and knives have also been uncovered. For more on archaeology in the region, go to “Letter from the Dead Sea: Life on a Busy[…]

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  • Hominin Tooth Analysis Offers Breastfeeding Clues

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jul 16, 2019 | 03:10 P

    Hominin Tooth Analysis Offers Breastfeeding Clues MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA—According to a Cosmos report, Renaud Joannes-Boyau of Southern Cross University and his colleagues analyzed levels of different elements in the growth rings of Australopithecus africanus teeth to investigate the hominin’s breastfeeding patterns. The four teeth, recovered from South Africa’s Sterkfontein Cave, belonged to two individuals who lived between 2.6 and 2.1 million years ago. The levels of barium, which is absorbed by growing teeth more readily on a diet of milk, suggest that Australopithecus africanus breastfed exclusively for the first six to nine months of life, and then added other foods, which can be tracked by levels of[…]

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