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Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • Possible Mammoth-Tusk Spear Found in Mammoth’s Ribs

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 8, 2017 | 22:53 P

    YAKUTSK, RUSSIA—Newsweek reports that scientists led by Semyon Grigoriev of Russia’s Northeastern Federal University have recovered a 14-inch-long weapon from among the ribs of a woolly mammoth unearthed in northeastern Russia. Grigoriev said the weapon appears to be the end of a spear made by grinding a mammoth tusk with a stone—a technique that dates back about 12,000 years. Testing could help scientists determine the age of the artifact and if it was the weapon that killed the beast. For more, go to “Leftover Mammoth.”

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  • New Thoughts on the Spread of Modern Humans

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 8, 2017 | 22:35 P

    New Thoughts on the Spread of Modern Humans MANOA, HAWAII—The “Out of Africa” theory suggests that a wave of modern humans left Africa some 60,000 years ago to spread across Eurasia. But according to an International Business Times report, an international group of researchers suggests that humans may have started leaving Africa as early as 120,000 years ago, based upon a review of DNA evidence, and the analysis of newly discovered fossils from around the world. Among those fossils are Homo sapiens remains dating between 70,000 and 120,000 years ago found in southern and central China, and Homo sapiens remains, dated to more than 60,000 years ago, recovered[…]

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  • Rock Art in Venezuela Mapped With Drones

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 8, 2017 | 22:12 P

    Rock Art in Venezuela Mapped With Drones LONDON, ENGLAND—UPI reports that scientists have used drones to map rock art in the Orinoco River basin in southern Venezuela. Low water levels throughout the river basin exposed more of the engravings, thought to have been carved as early as 2,000 years ago by the Adoles people, than are usually visible. The images may have communicated information about seasonal water levels and other natural resources in the area. Philip Riris of University College London said the images are similar to those found in Brazil, Colombia, and other sites in South America. For more, go to “The First Artists.”

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  • Hunter-Gatherer Storytelling May Have Promoted Cooperation

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 8, 2017 | 21:57 P

    Hunter-Gatherer Storytelling May Have Promoted Cooperation LONDON, ENGLAND—Tales told by traditional storytellers often promoted cooperation and egalitarian values, according to a study conducted by Andrea Migliano of University College London and her colleagues. According to a Seeker report, Migliano and her team visited the Agta people of Northern Sierra Madre Natural Park in the Philippines, and heard Agta elders tell the tales firsthand. “We then decided to test if camps (within the Agta) with good storytellers had increased levels of cooperation, without really expecting to find anything,” Migliano said. “But the effect was still there. Camps with more storytellers were more cooperative. The stories seem to[…]

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  • Looted Tombs Investigated in Eastern Turkey

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 7, 2017 | 22:37 P

    ERZURUM, TURKEY—Hurriyet Daily News reports that researcher Ömer Faruk Kizilkaya is investigating a heavily looted settlement dating to the Iron Age in eastern Anatolia. Tombs carved into the rock of a cave, a water tunnel, and a temple have been found near the settlement. Kizilkaya thinks the tombs may have been reserved for the elites of the community, such as rulers of the Urartu Kingdom and religious leaders. Haldun Özkan of Atatürk University explained that similar rock tombs have been found in the region. Such tombs were often made with several smooth-walled chambers for use in the afterlife. Kizilkaya has[…]

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