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Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • Archaeologists Investigate Woodstock Concert Site

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jun 21, 2018 | 21:25 P

    Archaeologists Investigate Woodstock Concert Site BETHEL, NEW YORK—According to an Associated Press report, archaeologist Josh Anderson of Binghamton University and a team of researchers are investigating Max Yasgur’s farm, the site of the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in preparation for the 50th anniversary of the concert. Grading of the hillside in the late 1990s obscured the location of the stage where Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin, Joe Cocker, and others played to a crowd of more than 400,000 over a period of three days. So far, Anderson thinks his team has found a hole that marks a corner in[…]

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  • Experiment Produces Neanderthal “Minibrains”

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jun 21, 2018 | 20:48 P

    Experiment Produces Neanderthal “Minibrains” SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA—Science Magazine reports that geneticist Alysson Muotri of the University of California, San Diego, led a group of scientists who combined the study of ancient DNA, the editing of genomes with CRISPR, and building “organoids” from stem cells to create what they call “Neanderoids.” The researches swapped one protein-coding gene from the Neanderthal genome into human stem cells that grew into pea-sized masses resembling the cortex, or outer layer of the brain. When compared to brain organoids made with only modern human DNA, the neuronal cells in the Neanderoids migrate more quickly as they form structures, the Neanderoid[…]

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  • Ötzi the Iceman’s Copper-Age Tools Analyzed

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jun 21, 2018 | 20:12 P

    Ötzi the Iceman’s Copper-Age Tools Analyzed FLORENCE, ITALY—Live Science reports that a team led by archaeologist Ursula Wierer of Italy’s Soprintendenza Archeologia has examined the tools carried by the frozen mummy known as Ötzi the Iceman with high-powered microscopes and computed tomography scans. The 45-year-old man died in the Italian Alps sometime between 3370 and 3100 B.C., most likely due to a head injury or an arrow thought to have pierced an artery in in his shoulder. He was carrying a dagger, an end scraper, a borer, a flake, an antler retoucher, and two arrowheads at the time of his death. Wierer said an opaque patina[…]

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  • Seventeenth-Century Danish Latrines Analyzed

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jun 20, 2018 | 20:38 P

    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK—Cosmos reports that two latrines made from partially buried wine barrels were found under a road that cut through the center of Copenhagen in the late seventeenth century. The latrines were originally placed in a garden. Mette Marie Hald of Denmark’s National Museum analyzed the excrement in the barrels, and found the residents enjoyed a diet of barley, oats, wild cherries, coriander, turnips, lettuce, hops, and mustard, in addition to herring, eels, and pork. Most of the recovered bone fragments were too degraded to identify, however. Some of the foods eaten by the Danes had been imported, such as[…]

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  • Limbs of Wounded Civil War Soldiers Found in Virginia

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Jun 20, 2018 | 20:06 P

    Limbs of Wounded Civil War Soldiers Found in Virginia MANASSAS, VIRGINIA—According to an NPR report, a burial pit containing amputated human limbs has been discovered at Manassas National Battlefield Park. The bones in the “limb pit” were first spotted by a utility crew in 2014, and are thought to have been buried by field surgeons after the three-day Battle of Second Manassas, which is also known as the Second Battle of Bull Run. In all, two complete skeletons, 11 limbs, bullet fragments, and buttons from Union uniforms have been recovered from the pit. All of the limbs bear evidence of wounds and amputation cuts. Physical anthropologist Doug Owsley of[…]

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